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Thursday, 29 September 2016

Eldis Climate Change and Development Reporter

In this issue: Special focus on China

Climate change

With a focus across adaptation, mitigation & development, the climate change guide covers agriculture & food security, natural resource management, poverty & vulnerability, governance, health, gender, finance, & low carbon energy.

HOME LATEST NEWS TOPICS COUNTRY PROFILES JOBS CONTACT

Eldis Climate Change and Development Reporter

29 September 2016
Eldis Climate Change Resource Guide: http://www.eldis.org/climate

This is our regular bulletin that highlights recent publications on climate change and development issues.

The documents are available without charge on the web. If you are unable to access any of these materials online and would like to receive a copy of a document as an email attachment, please contact our editor at the email address given below.


In this issue:

 



A new era for China's renewable energy development? External shocks, internal struggles and policy changes
Authors: W. Shen

Produced by: Institute of Development Studies, Sussex [ES] (2016)

This Evidence Report investigates the changes in China'€™s wind and solar energy policies, and argues that since late 2012 a new policy paradigm has been taking shape within the Chinese renewable energy policy community due to a series of external and internal shocks.

These policy changes will, the research suggests, have a tremendous impact on how China is going to further develop its renewable energy sector. R enewable energy industries in China are at a critical crossroads and are moving towards a new era that contrasts sharply with the previous decade , which was characterised by the massive capacity expansion of wind and solar farms.

A number of emerging external and internal dynamics are affecting both policy priorities and process, which have consequently had a tremendous impact on the existing institu tional arrangement s and interest constellation s that have developed in the past decade. As these policy changes would ultimately affect China's capability to fulfil its emissions reduction pledge at an international level, it is therefore crucial to understand both the deep causes of these changes and their implications for the future of China'€™s renewable energy industries.


Available online at: http://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/bitstream/handle/123456789/11641/ER196_ANewEraforChinasRenewableEnergyDevelopmentExternalShocksInternalStrugglesandPolicyChanges.pdf?sequence=1 Back to list
A greener dragon? Climate change lessons and opportunities for cooperation between China and Australia
Authors: N. Fox

Produced by: (2016)

China's commitment to climate change mitigation is an important economic issue for Australia. As China is Australia's largest trading partner, any adjustments China makes to its economy will impact the Australian economy.
 
China has been signalling the importance of the environment and climate to its economy since the release in 2001 of its 10th Five Year Plan (2001‐05), in which it set targets for fuel consumption and energy conservation, and foreshadowed an expansion of forests as 'carbon sinks'. This was followed in 2008 by a White Paper on Climate Change.
 
More recently, the 12th Five Year Plan set a target for the reduction of energy intensity and signalled an intention to price carbon by trialling an emissions trading scheme.
 
This presents opportunities for Australia to leverage its trading relationships to work with trading partners in order to mitigate climate change as a threat to human security. Climate change can threaten human security by slowing economic growth, making poverty reduction more difficult, and eroding food and water security. Climate change impacts are also likely to result in human
displacement and migration, particularly in the Indo‐Pacific region.
 
This paper examines the impact of climate change on Australia, and whether there are lessons and opportunities for cooperation from China's experience. It contends that Australia is seemingly out of alignment with the international community in addressing climate change, not least because Australia's mitigation actions have been constrained by economic reliance on coal exports, the domestic use of coal for energy production and the influence of vested mining interests on climate change policy.
 
The paper argues that Australia needs a strategy to communicate and demonstrate to the Australian public that mitigating and adapting to climate change is in Australia's national interest, particularly in relation to human and comprehensive security issue s. It concludes that Australia can benefit from China's experience as a 'greener dragon', offering lessons for Australia on achieving climate change‐related economic and energy reform, as well as sustainable development and cooperation opportunities.

Available online at: http://www.defence.gov.au/ADC/Publications/IndoPac/Fox_Greener_Dragon_IPSP.pdf Back to list
Overcoming obstacles to U.S.-China cooperation on climate change
Authors: K. Lieberthal; D. Sandalow

Produced by: Brookings Institution (2009)

U.S.-China relations have evolved and grown enormously since the Nixon visit to Beijing in 1972. But despite this progress, underlying mutual distrust over long-term intentions has grown and can over time make mutual antagonism a self-fulfilling prophecy. U.S.-China relations should now advance to a new stage that has the two countries consult and cooperate to address the most critical global issues of the 21st century. Climate change and clean energy, along with the global economic crisis, offer turning points. Cooperation on climate change can help move U.S.-China relations to a new stage; failure to cooperate can introduce significant new tensions.

This report recommends ways to overcome obstacles to cooperation between the United States and China on climate change. The report is intended for senior leadership in each country, with the goal of helping them:

• understand relevant conditions in the other country
• appreciate the priorities and constraints of counterparts across the Pacific
• take action to control greenhouse gas emissions at home
• develop specific avenues of bilateral cooperation
• facilitate agreement in multilateral negotiations on these topics


Available online at: https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/01_climate_change_lieberthal_sandalow.pdf Back to list
China's climate promises under economic pressure: scenarios and implications
Authors: J. W├╝bbeke; B. Conrad

Produced by: (2015)

China's new-found willingness to integrate its national climate policies into international climate negotiations is arguably the single most momentous development in international climate politics in recent times. It removes one of the major stumbling
blocks of past climate negotiations.

There are strong reasons to believe that China will make good on its promises. China's climate change strategy is connected to the objectives of the current economic restructuring. The link between climate change goals and China's economic interests lends credibility to its international commitments. But will this link hold? Will the alignment of climate change objectives and economic goals survive under the new conditions of economic slowdown and corresponding political pressures?

There are three scenarios of China's climate policy presented in the brief:

• "Backslide"
• "Acceleration"
• "Delay"

Short-term measures threaten climate targets:
• the economic slowdown will not automatically lead to declining CO2 emissions in China. The trajectory of CO2 emissions crucially depends on how remaining growth is being generated
• as maintaining growth and preventing unemployment becomes the priority, long-term structural changes are likely to be postponed. Short-term stimulus through infrastructure and construction threatens China's climate targets

Implications for European decision-makers:


• a full climate backslide is unlikely. But the changing economic context in China raises questions about the validity of China's climate change commitments. The temptation to create short-term growth at the expense of long-term climate goals will rise
• under economic pressure, China's government becomes more likely to revert on recent trends and again prioritise domestic flexibility over international commitments. Agreements need to be reached and fixed quickly before the window of opportunity closes
• EU-China mechanisms of climate change cooperation support a long-term, structural transition. But the emerging challenge is of a different nature. European actors should shift focus towards ways to confront the short-term need for growth and employment without derailing China's climate change efforts

 

 


Available online at: http://www.merics.org/fileadmin/user_upload/downloads/China_Policy_Brief/MERICS_China_Policy_Brief_November_en.pdf Back to list
Climate change, food, water and population health in China
Produced by: Bulletin of the World Health Organization : the International Journal of Public Health (2016)

Anthropogenic climate change appears to be increasing the frequency, duration and intensity of extreme weather events. Such events have already had substantial impacts on socioeconomic development and population health. Climate change's most profound impacts are likely to be on food, health systems and water.
 
This paper explores how climate change will affect food, human health and water in China. Projections indicate that the overall effects of climate change, land conversion and reduced water availability could reduce Chinese food production substantially – although uncertainty is inevitable in such projections. Climate change will probably have substantial impacts on water resources – e.g. changes in rainfall patterns and increases in the frequencies of droughts and floods in some areas of China. Such impacts would undoubtedly threaten population health and well-being in many communities.
 
In the short-term, population health in China is likely to be adversely affected by increases in air temperatures and pollution. In the medium to long term, however, the indirect impacts of climate change – e.g. changes in the availability of food, shelter a nd water, decreased mental health and well-being and changes in the distribution and seasonality of infectious diseases – are likely to grow in importance. The potentially catastrophic consequences of climate change can only be avoided if all countries work to gether towards a substantial reduction in the emission of so-called greenhouse gases and a substantial increase in the global population's resilience to the risks of climate variability and change.

Available online at: http://www.who.int/bulletin/online_first/BLT.15.167031.pdf?ua=1 Back to list

 

 


See our Climate Change Resource Guide for a complete list of new additions.

You are welcome to re-use material from this bulletin on your own website but please acknowledge Eldis as the source and include a link to the Eldis website (either to our home page or to the home page of one of our Resource Guides). Eldis data is available under a creative commons license and made it accessible via an Open API for others to re-use. In addition we have developed a number of plug-ins and modules for website content management systems such as WordPress, Joomla and Drupal to make it easier for website managers and bloggers to integrate Eldis content into their sites. See http://www.eldis.org/go/get-the-data for more information

If you only have email access to the Internet, we can send you a copy of a document as an email attachment.

If you would like to change your subscription or receive this bulletin (or any other of our subject focused email bulletins) regularly, you can register from our home page, or just email to the address below.

You can also receive this update as an RSS Newsfeed. Visit our page at: http://www.eldis.org/go/subscribe


The Eldis Climate Change Resource Guide is funded by the Climate Development Knowledge Network (CDKN). CDKN aims to help decision-makers in developing countries design and deliver climate compatible development. For more information, please go to: http://www.cdkn.org

The views expressed in this newsletter and on the Eldis website are the opinion of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Eldis, IDS or its funders.


Contact details:

Eldis Programme
Institute of Development Studies
Sussex Brighton BN1 9RE
UK

Email: eldis@ids.ac.uk
Tel: +44 1273 915776
Fax: +44 1273 621202
WWW:
http://www.eldis.org/climatechange


If you would like to receive information about other services from IDS such as publications, events, training and research, please sign-up here.


Eldis Resource Guides
Agriculture and food Climate change Conflict and security Evidence for Policy and Practice Gender Governance Global health ICTs for development Nutrition Rising Powers
Copyright © 2013 The Institute of Development Studies, All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is: Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9RE. UK

Thursday, 22 September 2016

Eldis Climate Change and Development Reporter

In this issue: The latest additions to the Eldis Climate Change Resource Guide

Climate change

With a focus across adaptation, mitigation & development, the climate change guide covers agriculture & food security, natural resource management, poverty & vulnerability, governance, health, gender, finance, & low carbon energy.

HOME LATEST NEWS TOPICS COUNTRY PROFILES JOBS CONTACT

Eldis Climate Change and Development Reporter

22 September 2016
Eldis Climate Change Resource Guide: http://www.eldis.org/climate

This is our regular bulletin that highlights recent publications on climate change and development issues.

The documents are available without charge on the web. If you are unable to access any of these materials online and would like to receive a copy of a document as an email attachment, please contact our editor at the email address given below.


In this issue:

 



Climate resilient development: experience from an African capacity development programme
Produced by: (2016)

This learning brief presents insights and lessons learned from a capacity development programme on water security and climate resilient development covering eight countries in Africa – Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Ghana, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tunisia and Zimbabwe. The programme engaged some 140 participants and 30 lecturers/mentors, and held over 50 workshops. Large investments were made in the development of learning material in three languages (English, French and Portuguese), the establishment of national management and lecturing units, and building a strong sense of programme ownership in each country.

The capacity to promote water security and integrate climate change considerations into national planning processes is still limited in most of the eight countries. However, following the implementation of this programme, much has been learned by individual participants, their home institutions, and engaged lecturers, and there are now many ongoing initiatives that promote the inclusion of climate change considerations in national development efforts. There is great scope both to extend the programme for several more rounds in the same countries, and to expand to other countries. With significant efforts already invested into the development of learning materials and training of trainers (ToT), the cost per participant will be much reduced in future new programmes.


Available online at: http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/file/WaterCapacity_Final_WEB.pdf Back to list
Becoming a climate-resilient green economy: planning for climate compatible development in Ethiopia
Authors: R. Redda; R. Roland

Produced by: Climate and Development Knowledge Network (2016)

Ethiopia has emerged as one of Africa's champions in responding to the implications of climate change. This is demonstrated by the strong commitment shown by the country's political leadership on the issues. Much of this commitment has been driven by the impacts of climatic events in Ethiopia, mainly the drought episodes that have hit the country since the early 1970s. These experiences have contributed to the widespread understanding that climate change can have severe consequences, and has the potential to hold back economic progress and reverse the gains made in Ethiopia's development.
 
This Working Paper documents Ethiopia's lessons from the study 'Lesson learning from national climate compatible development planning', which aimed to capture and share institutional experiences of climate compatible development, and provide recommendations for the future. Kenya, Mozambique and Rwanda also participated.
 
Conclusions and lessons learned:
 
Establishing a climate-resilient green economy is a nationally owned process and a priority for Ethiopia. It is being driven domestically, with substantive investments – being made from national budgets, international climate finance, and multilateral and bilateral partners. As a result, there are several large-scale initiatives underway in a range of priority sectors, which will bring about substantial climate-resilience and low-carbon benefits.

Other decision-makers and development practitioners can learn from the Ethiopian experience, which includes the following lessons:
 
  • financing from international climate funds should be available to countries that pursue a holistic, ambitious and nationally driven development agenda that includes climate-related goals, such as zero growth in net carbon emissions or enhancing the adaptive capacity of communities. The opportunities presented by international climate funds set the tempo for Ethiopia to realign its strategic thinking in order to attract this financing for climate compatible development
  • engagement by political champions enhances the development and implementation of the governance and institutional arrangements, strategies and frameworks needed for climate compatible development
  • robust governance and institutional structures form a strong basis for establishing effective cross-government working relations. These are important for the development and implementation of climate compatible development interventions, which are inherently cross-cutting in nature
  • collaboration between the ministries responsible for finance and the environment creates a solid platform for the coordinated implementation and mainstreaming of climate compatible development into national development plans
  • commitment, ownership, nationally driven investments and the demonstration of results on the ground are critical for unlocking additional finance to implement climate compatible development programmes and projects
  • in planning and mainstreaming climate compatible development, decision-makers should give consideration to long-term technical and institutional capacity development, particularly in terms of the ongoing need to prepare fundable project and programme proposals and subsequently to implement these

Available online at: http://cdkn.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Green-economy-Ethiopia.pdf Back to list
Climate change complicates Dengue fever prevention in Can Tho
Produced by: Institute For Social And Environmental Transition (2016)

Can Tho in Vietnam is a growing city of about one million people, approximately half of whom live in the city's peripheral rural districts. Rapid land conversion and population increase in peri-urban areas just outside the high-density urban core means that new residents are moving into areas that still have a lot of open space and limited public health infrastructure. Dengue fever incidence has increased in Can Tho in recent years. Recent migrants who live in poor quality housing conditions are especially vulnerable.
 
Disease transmission is linked to mosquito activity, which increases as the temperature rises and as there is more access
to clean water for breeding. Climate change can lead to increased populations of the Aedes aegyptii mosquito that carries dengue and an expansion of the species' range. This project studied the empirical connection between dengue fever incidence and climate parameters in Can Tho city. It also tested responses designed to increase the capacity of public health staff and city residents to reduce exposure to dengue including creating new institutions for health promotion.
 
Lessons for policy and practice:
 
The project results show the importance of community-based monitoring, and awareness and prevention practices for dengue fever as climate change leads to greater mosquito activity in the Mekong Delta. Surveillance methods should include multiple indicators of dengue risk in order to focus preventive measures in areas where risks are higher. Larval monitoring is critical to enable timely and targeted mosquito control. These methods require the engagement of community actors and other city agencies (e.g. Department of Education, ward officials) in addition to Department of Health staff. Health clubs can serve an important role in community development and promoting health outcomes, including dengue fever prevention.
 
 

Available online at: http://i-s-e-t.org/file_download/22e61f83-b684-41e9-8986-ad18133722a4 Back to list
How do gender approaches improve climate compatible development? Lessons from India
Authors: R. Sogani; K.R. Viswanathan; R. Clements

Produced by: Climate and Development Knowledge Network (2016)

Although evidence shows that women are both victims of climate change and important contributors of knowledge and skills in disaster risk, adaptation and mitigation strategies, the gender perspective is largely missing from the design and planning of climate change responses and policies. In addition, most research into gender and climate change has been exclusively conducted in rural contexts. There is strong scope for filling these knowledge gaps to improve the understanding of the relationship between gender and climate change in urban settings.
 
This policy brief explores the advantages and challenges of integrating a gender dimension into climate compatible development strategies in urban settings, with a focus on the Asian Cities Climate Change Resilience Network (ACCCRN) project in India. An initiative funded by The Rockefeller Foundation, the project was implemented in Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh by the Gorakhpur Environmental Action Group (GEAG).
 
Key messages:
  • urban scenarios in India are highly complex, with many social dimensions in terms of caste, gender and class. As such, a gender-sensitive approach to climate compatible development is fundamentally different in cities, compared with one in rural areas
  • urban residents demonstrate different vulnerabilities and capacities for facing the impacts of climate change than people living in rural areas, principally: weaker social cohesion, with the result that women and marginalised people are more dependent on external help in times of need; a higher likelihood of flooding and waterlogging due to poor infrastructure and basic services; and a higher likelihood of food insecurity
  • project activities should be adapted to address these gender differences, for example, by working through community volunteers and arranging meetings to suit men and women's availability
  • popular participatory methods developed in the context of rural settings can be adapted to suit the urban setting. In the case of the ACCCRN project, this involved undertaking Participatory Urban Appraisals through several smaller meetings, so as to understand the diversity of factors and issues involved

Available online at: http://cdkn.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/India-gender-brief-FINAL.pdf Back to list
Climate extremes and resilient poverty reduction
Authors: E. Wilkinson; K. Peters

Produced by: Overseas Development Institute (2015)

Building resilience to climate extremes and disasters will help ensure the success of global efforts to eliminate extreme poverty. Reaching and sustaining zero extreme poverty, the first of the SDGs, requires a collective effort to manage the risks of current
climate extremes and projected climate change.
 
This report explores the relationships between climate change and poverty, focusing on climate extremes, on the basis that these manifestations of climate change will most affect our attempts to reduce poverty over the next 15 to 25 years. Framed by a wider analysis, three detailed studies – on drought risk in Mali, heatwaves in India and typhoons in the Philippines – illustrate the relationship between climate change, climate extremes, disasters and poverty impacts.
 
All three case studies show the disproportionate impact of climate extremes on those living below the poverty line and those who suffer from non-income dimensions of poverty. Immediate impacts on poor households include loss of life (and associated loss of household earnings), illness, and loss of crops and other assets. Longer-term effects include increases in the price of staple foods, a reduction in food security, malnourishment, malnutrition and stunting in children, as well as lower educational attainment.
 
The report calls for improved resilience to climate extremes as a requisite for achieving poverty reduction targets. To achieve this, planners and policy makers will need to support the strengthening of the absorptive, anticipatory and adaptive capacities of communities and societies. New ways of working are required to link institutions that have previously been poorly connected, with new criteria for decision-making, such as considering the best solutions across different possible climate futures. The scale of the challenge suggests more transformative actions may be necessary, including through the use of new risk financing mechanisms.

Available online at: https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/10130.pdf Back to list
World heritage and tourism in a changing climate
Produced by: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (2016)

There are more than 1000 World Heritage properties in 163 countries and a great many of them are important tourist destinations. At its best, tourism drives economic development and brings needed financial and social benefits, but, as this report demonstrates, rapid or unplanned tourism developments, or excessive visitor numbers, can also have a negative effect on the properties. Climate change is likely to exacerbate existing stresses and bring direct impacts of its own. Sea-level rise, higher temperatures, habitat shifts and more frequent extreme weather events such as storms, floods and droughts, all have the potential to rapidly and permanently change or degrade the very attributes that make World Heritage sites such popular tourist destinations.
 
This report and its case studies demonstrate the urgent need to better understand, monitor and address climate change threats to World Heritage sites.

Available online at: http://www.ucsusa.org/sites/default/files/attach/2016/05/world-heritage-and-tourism-in-a-changing-climate.pdf Back to list
Climate and disaster resilience
Produced by: World Bank Publications (2016)

The Pacific region is known to be one of the most exposed to natural hazards and climate change in the world. Pacific Island Countries (PICs) are exposed to a wide variety of natural hazards , including cyclones, droughts, earthquakes, electrical storms, extreme winds, floods, landslides, storm surges, tsunami and volcanic eruptions . Some of these hazards will be exacerbated by climate change. Average ocean and land temperatures are increasing, and the seasonality and duration of rainfall is changing. Over the coming decades, tropical cyclones are expected to increase in intensity, though not necessarily in frequency, and to move closer to the equator . Because of higher ocean temperature and ice sheet melt, sea level is risin g, thereby worsening coastal erosion and saline intrusion and increasing the severity of storm surges. All these impacts adversely affects agriculture, fisheries, coastal zones, water resources, health, and ecosystems and thus threaten entire communities a nd economies. The mere existence of low -lying atoll island nations like Kiribati, Tuvalu and RMI is threatened by sea level rise and storm surges , since they are only 1 -3m above sea level.

This report hightlights that:

  • people and economies in the Pacific are particularly vulnerable to hazard and climate change impacts because of geographical remoteness and isolation, dispersion across a large area in the Pacific Ocean, economic and social challenges and the degradation of natural resources
  • despite a consensus that PICs will be disproportionately impacted by climate change, assessing the future cost of climate-change impacts in the Pacific Region is challenging
  • despite these challenges, it is possible to design resilient development strategies using new decision frameworks

 

 


Available online at: http://pubdocs.worldbank.org/en/720371469614841726/PACIFIC-POSSIBLE-Climate.pdf Back to list
Climate impacts on food security and livelihoods in Asia: a review of existing knowledge
Produced by: United Nations [UN] World Food Programme (2016)

There is agreement in the scientific community that the global food system will experience unprecedented pressure in the coming decades – demographic changes, urban growth, environmental degradation, increasing disaster risk, food price volatility, and climate change will all affect food security patterns.
 
The Asian continent is particularly vulnerable to climate change due to a combination of: high reliance on climate-sensitive livelihoods, high incidence of poverty and food insecurity, and high population densities in vulnerable and areas highly exposed to climate-related hazards such as floods, cyclones and droughts, and long-term climate change such as gradual changes in monsoon patterns, glacier melt and sea-level rise.
 
The purpose of this primer is to review the current state of knowledge on the relationship between climate change and food security, focusing specifically on the Asian context, to provide an evidence base for discussion and further analysis.

Available online at: http://documents.wfp.org/stellent/groups/public/documents/newsroom/wfp281745.pdf Back to list

 

 


See our Climate Change Resource Guide for a complete list of new additions.

You are welcome to re-use material from this bulletin on your own website but please acknowledge Eldis as the source and include a link to the Eldis website (either to our home page or to the home page of one of our Resource Guides). Eldis data is available under a creative commons license and made it accessible via an Open API for others to re-use. In addition we have developed a number of plug-ins and modules for website content management systems such as WordPress, Joomla and Drupal to make it easier for website managers and bloggers to integrate Eldis content into their sites. See http://www.eldis.org/go/get-the-data for more information

If you only have email access to the Internet, we can send you a copy of a document as an email attachment.

If you would like to change your subscription or receive this bulletin (or any other of our subject focused email bulletins) regularly, you can register from our home page, or just email to the address below.

You can also receive this update as an RSS Newsfeed. Visit our page at: http://www.eldis.org/go/subscribe


The Eldis Climate Change Resource Guide is funded by the Climate Development Knowledge Network (CDKN). CDKN aims to help decision-makers in developing countries design and deliver climate compatible development. For more information, please go to: http://www.cdkn.org

The views expressed in this newsletter and on the Eldis website are the opinion of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Eldis, IDS or its funders.


Contact details:

Eldis Programme
Institute of Development Studies
Sussex Brighton BN1 9RE
UK

Email: eldis@ids.ac.uk
Tel: +44 1273 915776
Fax: +44 1273 621202
WWW:
http://www.eldis.org/climatechange


If you would like to receive information about other services from IDS such as publications, events, training and research, please sign-up here.


Eldis Resource Guides
Agriculture and food Climate change Conflict and security Evidence for Policy and Practice Gender Governance Global health ICTs for development Nutrition Rising Powers
Copyright © 2013 The Institute of Development Studies, All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is: Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9RE. UK

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