Pages

Friday, 31 May 2013

Land degradation: bad for humans, bad for biodiversity



Land degradation: bad for humans, bad for biodiversity

 
A bird carcass on saline-heavy land (Senegal).
Land degradation—the loss of goods and services derived from our ecosystems, such as soil, vegetation, and other plant and animal life—not only poses a serious threat to long-term food security but puts wildlife diversity in grave danger.
Taking the form of desertification, deforestation, overgrazing, salinization, or soil erosion, land degradation can be caused by biophysical factors, such as the natural topography of an area or its rainfall, wind, and temperature; and unsustainable land management practices, such as deforestation, soil nutrient mining, and cultivation on steep slopes.
IFPRI Senior Researcher Ephraim Nkonya and his colleagues have been working to increase awareness of this problem and to push for comprehensive action to address it for many years. His work includes a 2011 book, where he and his co-authors point out that limited awareness and insufficient institutional support are paralyzing action. They advise policymakers and the international community to:

  •  decentralize natural resource management, invest in agricultural research and development, and build local capacity for participatory programs to ensure clear property rights, legal protection, and enforcement of those rights;

  • prioritize investments to scale up applied research, such as rigorous assessments of the economic costs of land degradation, and ensure collaboration across regions and among scientists, socio-economists, and policymakers; and

  • ollow models of influential global initiatives in related natural resource management areas, such as the Economics of Ecosystem Biodiversity study and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, involving all stakeholders in the process of global assessment.

IFPRI photographer Milo Mitchell accompanied Nkonya on a visit to regions in Uzbekistan, Niger, and Senegal where land degradation is particularly evident. It is clear from these photosthat humans are only one of many species that suffer the effects of this ongoing environmental problem.

Approaching Environmentalism In Africa




About Omar
I've lived in Africa my whole life, but have experienced what some would call an "expat" lifestyle. In many ways this has been a blessing, and I've...
 Much like in Frank Herbert’s "Dune", a science-fiction epic about characters attempting to rule a planet torn apart by conflict, the issue of balancing desires for resources, and their impact on people, faces much of Africa today. The planet that serves as the stage for that story, a barren desert where control over said resources dictates human events, in many ways mimics the present situation on the African continent. Addressing environmentalism and conservationism in Africa poses a multifaceted challenge as the continent faces a myriad competing priorities and obstacles. 
According to Tracy Bach, professor at the Vermont Law School specializing in Environmental Health Law who has taught at the Université Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar, Senegal, “desertification, biodiversity loss, and rising sea levels” are just a few among the many issues with which Africa must contend. The responses to these issues have varied across the continent. Take Senegal as an example, where the government has done significant work to address climate change through inter-departmental committees dedicated to achieving solutions. Combining the resources of different parts of government has proven key since, as Bach put it, “climate change is so pervasive you need people from ministries such as agriculture, urban planning, and sanitation” working together in order to address it. An effort to save the coastal homes of N’Gor in Dakar, that lie just a half meter above sea level, poses a problem not just for urban planners or construction workers, since it impacts multiple industries affected by this phenomenon, from fishing to tourism.
  Dire as it may seem, the present situation pales in comparison to the importance of the future of Africa’s environmental impact. From the high fertility rates across the continent contributing to rapid population growth to weak enforcement of regulations, obstacles abound. As it stands now, “Africa's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions are low in both absolute and per capita terms” as measured by the U.S. Department of Energy, yet dramatic change in future numbers remains a near certainty. Historians look back today and see the pitfalls of industrialization experienced in the United States and Europe, yet Africa seems doomed to repeat that trend. “Not reliving the same mistakes of industrialization elsewhere,” as Bach put it, is the main concern.
Today, various ways of addressing environmentalism in Africa exist. One prominently argued approach centers around Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, and how, as long as environmentalism appeals only to the higher levels of Maslow’s Hierarchy that most citizens in developed countries can concern themselves with, whilst ignoring the base needs that many in Africa have yet to meet, it will appear as nothing more than Western ideology. This, however, focuses only on the tip of the iceberg.

Though it remains important to tackle this problem at the level of local individuals, believing that this stands as the most important way to do so represents an erroneous approach. In order to effectively address Africa’s environmental impact, this challenge requires attention at the uppermost echelons, through the legislative branches of governments. Granted, legal systems in Africa vary in efficacy along a broad spectrum, with the World Justice Project’s Rule of Law Index rating Sub-Saharan African nations anywhere from the top third to the very bottom of the list of indexed nations. Regardless, the enforcement of laws, particularly those relating to environmental impact and restrictions, remains weak.
African impact on the environment, a complex issue, requires attention at various levels of society. First, not only must every nation’s book of law address more specific ways of controlling and moderating Africa’s growing impact on the planet’s environment, but enforcement of these laws must drastically improve. That, in and of itself, presents a mammoth task, as it will require addressing structural problems in many other aspects of government. Most Sub-Saharan African countries come in on the lower half of the most recent Corruption Perceptions Index, according to Transparency International; a sad fact and a depressing reality. Corrupt governments do not fix the very systems that could prosecute them; therefore, improving the leadership of governments remains paramount. Many African states elect governments via a direct democracy, meaning that, in theory, people vote to select their leaders, though this often falls short in practice.

The key to addressing Africa’s lack of a legal framework therefore lies in the people electing better governments. This requires improved education. For any feasible solution to Africa’s future environmental impact on this planet to exist, education of the population presents a vital first step, which can help lead to better governments being elected, which can in turn foster stronger judicial systems and better enforcement of laws in all sectors. One cannot approach Africa’s environmental effects on the Earth in the future as an isolated problem. For any feasible long-term solution, entire systems of government must improve, and ameliorated environmental laws will result.
 Frank Herbert’s "Dune", which ultimately centers around the uneasy balance between the environment, its resources, and the people on a small planet far, far away, mirrors the uncertain future of African environmentalism. It will take a sacrifice of short term goals for long term ones, a willingness to compromise, and motivation to work past the mind-numbingly tedious African bureaucracies that have retarded development for so long. One other thing about "Dune": It has a happy ending. Only time will tell if this can one day be accomplished on this continent.

Works Cited 
Bach, Tracy. Personal interview. 26 Apr. 2013.
Boden, T.A., G. Marland, and R.J. Andres. 2011. Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, Tenn., U.S.A. doi 10.3334/CDIAC/00001_V2011
Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton, 1965. Print.
"Rule of Law Index Scores and Rankings." Worldjusticeproject.org. The World Justice Project, n.d. Web. 05 May 2013. <http://www.worldjusticeproject.org/rule-of-law-index-data>.
Uwimana, Chantal. "Corruption Perceptions Index 2011: A Call to Action."Transparency.org. Transparency International, 30 Nov. 2011. Web. 05 May 2013. <http://blog.transparency.org/2011/11/30/corruption-perceptions-index-2011-a-call-to-action/>.

Related Articles on Science 2.0

Land degradation: bad for humans, bad for biodiversity



 
A bird carcass on saline-heavy land (Senegal).
Land degradation—the loss of goods and services derived from our ecosystems, such as soil, vegetation, and other plant and animal life—not only poses a serious threat to long-term food security but puts wildlife diversity in grave danger.
Taking the form of desertification, deforestation, overgrazing, salinization, or soil erosion, land degradation can be caused by biophysical factors, such as the natural topography of an area or its rainfall, wind, and temperature; and unsustainable land management practices, such as deforestation, soil nutrient mining, and cultivation on steep slopes.
IFPRI Senior Researcher Ephraim Nkonya and his colleagues have been working to increase awareness of this problem and to push for comprehensive action to address it for many years. His work includes a 2011 book, where he and his co-authors point out that limited awareness and insufficient institutional support are paralyzing action. They advise policymakers and the international community to:
·         decentralize natural resource management, invest in agricultural research and development, and build local capacity for participatory programs to ensure clear property rights, legal protection, and enforcement of those rights;
·         prioritize investments to scale up applied research, such as rigorous assessments of the economic costs of land degradation, and ensure collaboration across regions and among scientists, socio-economists, and policymakers; and
·         follow models of influential global initiatives in related natural resource management areas, such as the Economics of Ecosystem Biodiversity study and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, involving all stakeholders in the process of global assessment.
IFPRI photographer Milo Mitchell accompanied Nkonya on a visit to regions in Uzbekistan, Niger, and Senegal where land degradation is particularly evident. It is clear from these photos that humans are only one of many species that suffer the effects of this ongoing environmental problem.

Réduire le risque de catastrophes dans les bidonvilles

Réduire le risque de catastrophes dans les bidonvilles

NAIROBI, 23 septembre 2010 (IRIN) - Le risque de catastrophes disproportionné auquel sont exposés un milliard d’habitants des bidonvilles dans le monde pourrait être considérablement réduit par des investissements prudents, selon un rapport récent.

« Nous ne pouvons pas empêcher l’urbanisation, mais nous ne devons pas être naïfs ; tendance n’est pas synonyme de destin : les catastrophes peuvent être évitées », a dit Matthias Schmale, sous-secrétaire général de la Fédération internationale des sociétés de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge (FICR), à Nairobi, lors de la présentation mondiale de l’édition 2010 du Rapport sur les catastrophes dans le monde.

Selon Matthias Schmale, les solutions de réduction du risque de catastrophes et de préparation aux catastrophes « doivent être trouvées par le dialogue avec les communautés touchées ; en remontant de bas en haut ».

L’édition 2010 du Rapport sur les catastrophes dans le monde porte sur le risque urbain : selon la FICR, en effet, 2,57 milliards de citadins vivant dans des pays à faible et moyen revenus sont exposés à des niveaux de risque inacceptables, aggravés par l’urbanisation rapide, la mauvaise gouvernance locale, la croissance démographique, les services de santé insuffisants et une vague de violences urbaines.

Selon les estimations, un milliard de citadins vivent actuellement dans des quartiers pauvres surpeuplés ; ils seront 1,4 milliard d’ici à 2020, d’après le rapport, et l’Afrique, souvent considérée comme principalement rurale, « compte désormais une population urbaine plus importante (412 millions d’habitants) que l’Amérique du Nord (286 millions) ».

« La ville est la nouvelle campagne », selon M. Schmale. « Nous savons qu’il vaut mieux distribuer des semences que des vivres... nous devrions investir davantage dans la préparation, comme nous l’ont montré les dernières catastrophes en Haïti et au Chili ; l’ampleur de la catastrophe était plus importante au Chili, mais les répercussions étaient plus graves en Haïti ».

Selon la FICR, la pauvreté urbaine et le risque de catastrophe sont souvent étroitement liés et ce lien sera renforcé par le changement climatique.

« Chaque année, plus de 50 000 personnes peuvent mourir à la suite d’un séisme et 100 millions de personnes peuvent être touchées par les inondations ; et les plus touchés sont le plus souvent des citadins vulnérables », selon la FICR.

Leadership

D’après James Kisia, secrétaire général adjoint de la Société de la Croix-Rouge kényane (SCRK), la définition de développement social doit être repensée.

« L’Africain moyen des régions rurales ne vit pas dans un logement d’une pièce avec ses enfants, mais cela devient de plus en plus la norme dans les habitats informels des zones urbaines ; il semble que nous ayons livré ces problèmes sociaux à la merci du développement économique », a-t-il dit. « Le leadership ne saurait être confié au seul gouvernement : nous devons nous associer pour créer un environnement propice au développement social ».

La bonne gouvernance urbaine est un thème récurrent dans l’édition 2010 du Rapport sur les catastrophes dans le monde, la FICR soulignant qu’il est essentiel d’assurer que les populations soient responsabilisées et investies dans le développement de leur environnement urbain, et qu’elles ne soient « pas marginalisées, ni exposées aux catastrophes, au changement climatique, à la violence et à la mauvaise santé ».

La FICR a repris la citation suivante de David Satterthwaite, principal auteur du rapport et chercheur principal à l’International Institute of Environment and Development (IIED) : « La crise de pauvreté urbaine, l’expansion rapide des peuplements informels et les catastrophes urbaines, de plus en plus nombreuses, sont le résultat de l’incapacité des gouvernements à adapter leurs institutions à l’urbanisation ».

« Cela s’explique aussi en partie par le fait que les organisations humanitaires ne les aident pas [les gouvernements] à le faire : la plupart des organisations humanitaires ont des politiques urbaines inadaptées, voire inexistantes, et sont réticentes depuis longtemps à soutenir suffisamment le développement urbain ».

js/am/mw/nh/ail

Un traité mondial plus contraignant pour lutter contre la dégradation des terres

Un traité mondial plus contraignant pour lutter contre la dégradation des terres


JOHANNESBOURG, 30 mai 2013 (IRIN) - La communauté internationale a engagé des discussions quant à la nécessité de rendre plus contraignant un traité mondial sur la dégradation des terres signé récemment.

Presque tous les pays du monde ont ratifié la Convention des Nations Unies pour la lutte contre la désertification (CNULD). Leurs représentants examinent maintenant la possibilité de rédiger un protocole ou un instrument juridique afin de permettre sa mise en œuvre.

Melchiade Bukuru, chef du bureau de liaison de la CNULD situé au siège des Nations Unies à New York, a dit à IRIN que les discussions au sujet de l’adoption d’un éventuel protocole avaient beaucoup progressé.

Le secrétariat de la CNULD a d’abord évoqué l’idée d’un protocole à l’occasion de la conférence Rio+20, qui a eu lieu en 2012. La proposition a ensuite été étudiée lors des rencontres scientifiques de la Convention. Ces progrès sont considérés comme significatifs, car les choses évoluent souvent lentement dans les forums multilatéraux.

Le protocole aurait pour objectif l’atteinte d’un taux zéro de dégradation des terres (Zero Net Land Degradation, ZNLD). La CNULD espère qu’il facilitera l’application de la Convention de la même façon que l’a fait le Protocole de Kyoto pour la Convention cadre des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques (CCNUCC) pour la stabilisation des concentrations de gaz à effet de serre dans l’atmosphère.

Ian Hannam, président du groupe de spécialistes de l’utilisation durable des sols et de la désertification de la Commission du droit de l’environnement, qui dépend de l’Union internationale pour la conservation de la nature (UICN), la co-présidente Irene Heuser et l’ancien président Ben Boer militent en faveur de l’adoption d’un protocole depuis 2012.

« Ce nouvel instrument juridique pourrait prendre la forme d’une politique mondiale et d’un cadre de suivi », ont indiqué M. Hannam et ses collègues dans une déclaration. « Il a également été proposé que le protocole inclue les objectifs de chaque pays pour l’atteinte du taux zéro de dégradation des terres. Il pourrait s’agir, par exemple, d’un pourcentage des terres arables sous leur juridiction ou de régions situées dans les limites de leur juridiction. »

Le Protocole de Kyoto de la CCNUCC a obligé les pays à se fixer des objectifs assortis de délais pour la réduction des émissions à l’origine du réchauffement de la planète. Sa création se fondait cependant sur des données scientifiques, notamment la concentration des gaz à effet de serre et le taux de réchauffement de l’atmosphère. Si les données et les études à ce sujet continuent d’évoluer, le Groupe d’experts intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat (GIEC) a cependant jeté les bases de la connaissance scientifique dans ce domaine.

La CNULD milite en faveur de la création d’un organe similaire : le Panel intergouvernemental sur les terres et les sols (Intergovernmental Panel on Land and Soil, IPLS). Celui-ci servirait d’autorité mondiale et fournirait des informations scientifiques crédibles et pertinentes pour aider les pays à prendre des décisions éclairées dans la lutte contre la dégradation des terres et la désertification.

Pour l’heure, les données scientifiques crédibles permettant de déterminer l’ampleur du problème sont rares, a indiqué une équipe de scientifiques dans un rapport commandé par la CNULD en 2012.

Selon les résultats des cinq évaluations mondiales menées au cours des quarante dernières années, la proportion des terres dégradées se situe quelque part entre 15 et 63 pour cent et celle des terres arides dégradées, entre 4 et 74 pour cent.

Les variations importantes sont dues aux différentes variables et méthodes utilisées pour les calculs.

« Nous devons attirer l’attention des décideurs, et notamment de ceux qui sont indirectement responsables de [l’application de] la Convention, comme les ministres des Finances [qui décident de l’allocation des fonds nationaux], et leur faire comprendre la pertinence de mettre en place une [stratégie de] gestion durable des terres… »
Malgré tout, d’après les meilleures interprétations des images satellites, plus de 20 pour cent des terres situées à la surface de la Terre – et dont dépend 1,5 milliard de personnes – ont perdu leur capacité à produire entre 1981 et 2003. Ces données ne fournissent cependant pas de détails pour chaque pays.

« C’est le GIEC qui a jeté les bases et permis l’intégration du changement climatique dans les discours politiques et les politiques », a dit M. Bukuru, soulignant l’importance des panels scientifiques.

« Il y a encore une certaine résistance [de la part de certains pays membres], mais la majorité des pays sont en faveur de sa création. »

En attendant, a-t-il ajouté, les pays peuvent utiliser les services de la Plate-forme scientifique et politique intergouvernementale sur la biodiversité et les services de l’écosystème (Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystems Services, IPBES) créée en 2012. L’IPBES évaluera l’état de la biodiversité de la planète, ses écosystèmes et les services essentiels qu’ils fournissent à la société.

M. Bukuru a dit que la CNULD était, pendant ce temps, entrée dans « le domaine du mesurable » en ce qui concerne son protocole.

En 2009, tous les États signataires de la CNULD se sont entendus sur un ensemble d’indicateurs, notamment l’étendue des terres placées sous la juridiction d’une nation et le nombre de personnes vivant au-dessus du seuil de la pauvreté dans les régions affectées par la dégradation des terres et la désertification. Depuis 2012, les pays ont commencé à rendre compte de ces indicateurs, conformément à leurs obligations.

Pour démontrer la pertinence des données, M. Bukuru a dit que la carte de la pauvreté coïncidait généralement avec celle des terres dégradées dans la plupart des pays en développement, sauf dans les pays producteurs de pétrole.

Les auteurs d’une étude publiée en 2009 et dirigée par Zafar Adeel, directeur de l’Institut pour l’eau, l’environnement et la santé de l’Université des Nations Unies (UNU-INWEH), ont également appelé à la création d’un groupe d’experts scientifiques. « La CNULD n’a pas pu bénéficier [de la connaissance scientifique], et nombre de ses hypothèses de base sont aujourd’hui mises en doute. On croyait par exemple que le Sahara avançait en permanence, mais les mesures satellites et les études réalisées récemment sur le terrain ont montré que les avancées et les reculs de ce désert étaient cycliques. »

Soutien financier

La CNULD a également entrepris de « mettre un prix sur l’action ou l’inaction en ce qui concerne la dégradation des terres, la désertification et la sécheresse, et il se trouve que l’action est moins coûteuse que l’inaction », a dit M. Bukuru.

Selon un rapport sur l’un de ces efforts présenté à l’occasion d’une récente rencontre scientifique de la Convention, la dégradation des terres coûte chaque année environ 490 milliards de dollars à la communauté internationale. Certaines études citées dans le rapport utilisaient cependant des méthodes différentes pour évaluer la dégradation et il n’y avait pas suffisamment de données disponibles pour certains aspects, selon Wagaki Mwangi, porte-parole de la CNULD.

« Nous devons attirer l’attention des décideurs, et notamment de ceux qui sont indirectement responsables de [l’application de] la Convention, comme les ministres des Finances [qui décident de l’allocation des fonds nationaux], et leur faire comprendre la pertinence de mettre en place une [stratégie de] gestion durable des terres… dans le contexte de développement du pays – la sécurité alimentaire, la sécurité énergétique, l’adaptation au changement climatique ou la réduction de la pauvreté. »

L’idée est de réaliser une analyse poussée des coûts et des avantages, comme le rapport Stern sur l’économie du changement climatique, présentée en 2006 par Sir Nicholas Stern, conseiller principal sur l’économie du changement climatique et du développement auprès du gouvernement britannique. Le rapport attribue une valeur monétaire à l’impact du changement climatique et à l’absence de réaction rapide de la communauté internationale, ce qui a permis d’attirer l’attention des chefs d’État et des ministres des Finances sur le sujet.

La CNULD appuie une initiative mondiale appelée Economics of Land Degradation (ELD), à laquelle participent la Commission européenne, le Centre de recherche pour le développement de Bonn (Allemagne), l’Institut international de recherche sur les politiques alimentaires (IFPRI), l’UNU-INWEH et le gouvernement allemand. L’objectif est d’établir une base scientifique solide pour développer des stratégies durables d’utilisation des terres et de réaliser une analyse coûts-avantages afin de contribuer à sensibiliser le public.

Si le financement des projets de lutte contre la dégradation des terres et l’impact des sécheresses s’est amélioré, il reste toutefois encore trop limité. Selon Mohamed Bakarr, du Fonds pour l’environnement mondial (FEM), le principal mécanisme de financement de la CNULD, seulement 320 millions de dollars sont disponibles pour le moment pour financer des projets dans les 144 pays éligibles. L’argent n’est pas distribué également entre les pays, mais en fonction de critères qui prennent en considération divers facteurs.

jk/he –gd/amz

Theme (s): Economie, Environnement, Sécurité alimentaire, Démocratie et gouvernance, Catastrophes naturelles, Politique, Eau et Assainissement,
[Cet article ne reflète pas nécessairement les vues des Nations Unies

READ MORE RECENT NEWS AND OPINIONS

WASH news Africa

Jobs4Development.com Customised Jobs Feed

Eldis Climate Change

Eldis Climate Adaptation

Eldis Environment

CEPF Top Stories

Water Supply and Sanitation News

FAO/Forestry/headlines

InforMEA

GBIF News

CBD News Headlines

Sustainable Development Policy & Practice - Daily RSS Feed

IISD Linkages

IISD - Latest Additions

Climate Change Headlines

WWF - Environmental News

DESERTIFICATION

IUCN - News

IRIN - Water & Sanitation