Pages

Friday, 31 July 2009

Climate change and sustainable development in Africa

Climate change and sustainable development in Africa

MICHAEL BERNARD KWESI DARKOH

Climate change is no longer a debatable issue. In Africa, the evidence is clear. The continent is already experiencing the powerful impact of climate change.

Advertisement

Advertise Here
Weather patterns are becoming increasingly volatile and resulting in more droughts and floods, higher air and water temperatures. Sea levels are rising and coastal areas are eroding and experiencing saltwater intrusion and flooding. Lake Chad, once the sixth largest lake in the world and the second largest wetland in Africa has shrunk in the past 35 years to one tenth of its former size. The icecap on Mount Kilimanjaro is fast disappearing with serious implications for the rivers that depend on ice melt for their flow. Scientists estimate that there has been a reduction of about 82 per cent in the ice-cap since it was first surveyed in 1912. Likewise, the glaciers on the famous Ruwenzori Mountains, the so-called Mountains of the Moon, have shrunk by 50 per cent since the late 1980s. These decreases in both cases have been attributed largely to increased air temperature and decreased snow accumulation during the 20th century. If present rates of reduction continue, the ice-caps and glacier water reservoirs in Kilimanjaro and Ruwenzori will disappear within some two to three decades, with deleterious consequences for the dependent human livelihoods in the areas around these mountains and beyond.


Africa as a region is most vulnerable to climate change due to extreme poverty of many Africans and the heavy dependence on rainfall and other natural resources. Agriculture is the most important economic sector in most African countries. Because most of it is subsistence with high dependence on rainfall, it is highly vulnerable to changes in climate variability, seasonal shifts and precipitation patterns. The food security threat posed by climate change is particularly great, especially in the arid and semi arid Sudano- Sahel zone, Eastern and Southern African regions where in conjunction with the endemic threats of desertification, per capita food production has been steadily declining. As agricultural yields continue to drop by as much as half in some of these areas, other sources of income needs to be found for people to meet their basic needs. Economic necessity and competition for access to resources are already resulting in displacement, mass movement of people within countries and across borders, heightened social tensions and in many cases, conflicts. It has been argued that increased competition over land was one of the triggers of conflicts in Darfur in Western Sudan.
Africa is well known for its rich natural resources, especially wildlife, varied ecosystems, and picturesque landscapes.

The forest and savanna ecosystems, the rivers, lakes and wetlands, are currently under threat from natural and human pressures. In the dry lands of Africa, the heavy dependence of the rural poor population on natural resources for subsistence has largely contributed to land degradation and desertification. Projected climate change by the year 2025, associated with a rise in mean temperature, will exacerbate the losses already experienced due to drought and land degradation. The link between climate change and desertification is an issue that needs to be explored. Climate change has become an additional stressor which is leading to changes in habitats, causing species migration or extinction for both flora and fauna.
Environmental resources such as wetlands, grasslands woodlands and associated wildlife are currently natural resources upon which the burgeoning tourism activities in several dry land countries in Africa are built.

These resources are fragile because of the stressful climatic conditions. Any depreciation in any of the resources which tourists come to countries such as Kenya, Botswana, and South Africa to see would mean a decline in tourism's contribution to the national and local economy. Climate change poses an imponderable threat to this most important resource for the continued growth and development of tourism in these countries
Climate change also increases the risk of contracting vector borne diseases. In southern Africa, a disease that has made a spectacular come back in recent years after a successful campaign to curb it, is malaria. The malaria areas where the mosquitoes occur seem to have been growing larger, possibly because of global warming and changing rainfall patterns.

It is estimated that almost 30 million people in Southern Africa are at risk of severe malaria. Awareness of the potential impacts of climate change on human health is generally low within health sectors in Africa. Very few national or local assessments of the impacts of climate on human health have been undertaken. Such assessments would be of great value to health decision makers.
To sum up, climate change in Africa is already undermining economic development, increasing poverty and impeding development efforts in key sectors. For most rural people especially in the Drylands of Africa, climate change is making their already difficult lives impossible. There is a direct link between climate change and development.

However, although Africa's vulnerability is highly linked to climate variability and change, several other factors are exacerbating and accelerating the effects of climate change and making adaptation and coping strategies extremely difficult. These include the debt burden, structural adjustment policies, trade liberalization, conflicts, poverty and diseases (particularly malaria and HIV/AIDs).

In spite of the current low adaptive capacity of Africa, there are some African communities that have developed traditional adaptation strategies. For example, in response to the desiccation and decreasing rainfall in the Sahel since the late 1960s, farmers have shifted to shorter cycle varieties of millet and maize and abandoned crops like groundnuts that need higher rainfall. Other examples of the rich heritage of traditional adaptation strategies and social networks that African communities have developed to cope with climate variability and extreme events include: improved adaptive capacities by using traditional pruning and fertilizing techniques to double tree densities in Senegal, Burkina Faso, Zimbabwe and Madagascar, diversification of herds and incomes such as the introduction of sheep in place of goats in Western Sudan, reliance on forest products as a buffer to climate induced crop failure, decentralization of local governance of resources, and manipulation of land use leading to land use conversion Fortunately for Africa, the continent is still not heavily polluted and is not considered to be a major source of green house gas emissions. African countries must ensure that their limited contributions to the problem through green house gas emissions do not grow unacceptably.

The solution to the problem is sustainable development through mitigation and adaptation strategies. Adaptation, according to the IPCC's Third Assessment Report, refers to "the degree to which adjustments are possible in practices, processes or structures of systems to projected or actual changes in climate". Adaptive capacity must take place through the broad framework of sustainable development taking both environmental and socio-economic considerations into account. African countries need to mainstream adaptation, with governments taking adaptation into account in any future expenditure and development planning. Necessary legislative and government structures will have to facilitate sustainable development and climate change responses such as mitigation and adaptation within their bureaucratic process. They must develop existing and new capacities to cope with climate variability and change so as to increase the resilience of societies, of natural systems and of economies. Approaches to climate change adaptation that are based on top-down development models, which often have little relevance to local conditions, should be avoided. More effort is needed to strengthen the capacity of local people to develop their own knowledge and promote techniques that involve both scientific and indigenous knowledge.

National Adaptation Programs of Action (NAPAs) were established as a part of the Marrakech Accords in 2001, in recognition of the particular vulnerability of the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) to climate change. NAPAs provide a process for the LDCs to identify, communicate and respond to their most urgent and immediate adaptation needs. As of June 2008, 38 LDCs (including 29 African countries) had submitted NAPAs to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) for funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) (Ayers, 2008). Implementing NAPA projects can help build LDC resilience.

Despite progress on the development of NAPAs, the implementation of projects identified in NAPAs has been slow, largely owing to functional problems between countries and implementing agencies. It is vital that NAPA projects receive the financial and institutional support they require from donors, governments and climate change institutions
There is limited research on climate vulnerability and the approaches that could maximize resilience at regional, national and local levels. Consequently there is an urgent need to undertake comprehensive research and map out the complex impacts of global warming, integrating climate change risks with other vulnerabilities such as desertification, human health and diseases. Links between climate variability, air pollution and the occurrence and incidence of respiratory and vector borne diseases need exploring as does the impact of water scarcity in areas such as the dry lands of Africa.

African countries should implement sustainable development policies that prioritize energy efficiency and renewable energy. Clean Development Mechanism Projects (CDM) need to be promoted as a means to improve energy efficiency in industrial operations. CDM opens up new opportunities to generate substantial revenues for entrepreneurs and governments and diversify economies. CDM allows industrial countries to meet their carbon offset obligations by investing in projects that reduce emissions in developing countries as an alternative to more expensive emission reduction in their own countries.

The successful development of bio-fuels in African countries can be both an opportunity and a threat. An assessment is needed of the carbon benefits of different bio-fuel schemes, the risk of deforestation and socially negative impacts and whether there is competition between use of land for fuel or food

To help mitigate climate change and maintain valuable ecosystems, African countries should reduce and eventually halt deforestation. More stringent measures to protect Africa's rain forests from unsustainable logging and environmentally destructive development, including agricultural expansion, are needed. More protection for biodiversity and ecosystem integrity in wetlands and mountain regions is also vital.

Dramatically increased support for small scale agriculture is needed, with encouragement of diversification because diverse systems are more resilient and more productive than monocultures. Boosting production requires systems that combine new insights and technologies with the wisdom of tradition. Dangers associated with clearing forest land and planting bio-fuels as opposed to food crops should be avoided.

In conclusion, climate change-induced impacts are already undermining Africa's ability to develop. Climate change impacts have the potential to weaken Africa's adaptive capacity and compromise development efforts in key sectors of the region's economy. They could reduce livelihood security and delay or prevent the realization of the Millennium Development Goals. African countries must take the initiative in crafting development strategies that encompass the need to mainstream and boost adaptation to climate change as well as invest in infrastructure, clean energy, health, research and other sectors that go to the core of the national development strategies. Non governmental organizations and civil society groups can play a major role in strengthening local capacity to cope and supporting local action.

At the global level, any new climate deal should address the special needs of Africa, particularly its least developed countries. It should include binding commitments to ensure that they have access to financial resources and technological know how.As the world marches towards the coming summit in Copenhagen in December this year, we must ensure that the voice of the poor countries of the world is heard and that they are helped. These poor countries are suffering some of the greatest impacts despite their people having contributed the least to the human impact on climate. As Kofi Annan, former United Nations Secretary General and Nicholas Stern of the London School of Economics have recently admonished, the poor countries of the world should pursue a common negotiating stance and define a clear position on key issues, including the steps that they and their partners should take to ensure financing of adaptation and appropriate mitigation actions using new and additional sources of swiftly accessible funds, including from carbon markets, and to ensure that the existing international aid and commitment are met (ANNAN & STERN 2009). Finally, global climate change affects every one on the planet. We therefore need to find solutions that are based on genuine partnerships.
*Paper presented at the Pre -Valedictory Workshop in honor of Professor J B Opschoor on Climate Change and Making Development More Sustainable, Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, The Netherlands, 4th June 2009.
http://www.mmegi.bw/index.php?sid=6&aid=20&dir=2009/June/Friday12

Johannesburg Plan of Implementation

Johannesburg Plan of Implementation

VIII. Sustainable development for Africa

62. Since the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, sustainable development has remained elusive for many African countries. Poverty remains a major challenge and most countries on the continent have not benefited fully from the opportunities of globalization, further exacerbating the continent's marginalization. Africa's efforts to achieve sustainable development have been hindered by conflicts, insufficient investment, limited market access opportunities and supply side constraints, unsustainable debt burdens, historically declining levels of official development assistance and the impact of HIV/AIDS. The World Summit on Sustainable Development should reinvigorate the commitment of the international community to address these special challenges and give effect to a new vision based on concrete actions for the implementation of Agenda 21 in Africa. The New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) is a commitment by African leaders to the people of Africa. It recognizes that partnerships among African countries themselves and between them and with the international community are key elements of a shared and common vision to eradicate poverty, and furthermore it aims to place their countries, both individually and collectively, on a path of sustained economic growth and sustainable development, while participating actively in the world economy and body politic. It provides a framework for sustainable development on the continent to be shared by all Africa's people. The international community welcomes NEPAD and pledges its support to the implementation of this vision, including through utilization of the benefits of South-South cooperation supported, inter alia, by the Tokyo International Conference on African Development. It also pledges support for other existing development frameworks that are owned and driven nationally by African countries and that embody poverty reduction strategies, including poverty reduction strategy papers. Achieving sustainable development includes actions at all levels to:
(a) Create an enabling environment at the regional, subregional, national and local levels in order to achieve sustained economic growth and sustainable development and support African efforts for peace, stability and security, the resolution and prevention of conflicts, democracy, good governance, respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, including the right to development and gender equality;
(b) Support the implementation of the vision of NEPAD and other established regional and subregional efforts, including through financing, technical cooperation and institutional cooperation and human and institutional capacity-building at the regional, subregional and national levels, consistent with national policies, programmes and nationally owned and led strategies for poverty reduction and sustainable development, such as, where applicable, poverty reduction strategy papers;
(c) Promote technology development, transfer and diffusion to Africa and further develop technology and knowledge available in African centres of excellence;
(d) Support African countries in developing effective science and technology institutions and research activities capable of developing and adapting to world class technologies;
(e) Support the development of national programmes and strategies to promote education within the context of nationally owned and led strategies for poverty reduction and strengthen research institutions in education in order to increase the capacity to fully support the achievement of internationally agreed development goals related to education, including those contained in the Millennium Declaration on ensuring that, by 2015, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling and that girls and boys will have equal access to all levels of education relevant to national needs;
(f) Enhance the industrial productivity, diversity and competitiveness of African countries through a combination of financial and technological support for the development of key infrastructure, access to technology, networking of research centres, adding value to export products, skills development and enhancing market access in support of sustainable development;
(g) Enhance the contribution of the industrial sector, in particular mining, minerals and metals, to the sustainable development of Africa by supporting the development of effective and transparent regulatory and management frameworks and value addition, broad-based participation, social and environmental responsibility and increased market access in order to create an attractive and conducive environment for investment;
(h) Provide financial and technical support to strengthen the capacity of African countries to undertake environmental legislative policy and institutional reform for sustainable development and to undertake environmental impact assessments and, as appropriate, to negotiate and implement multilateral environment agreements;
(i) Develop projects, programmes and partnerships with relevant stakeholders and mobilize resources for the effective implementation of the outcome of the African Process for the Protection and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment;
(j) Deal effectively with energy problems in Africa, including through initiatives to:
(i) Establish and promote programmes, partnerships and initiatives to support Africa's efforts to implement NEPAD objectives on energy, which seek to secure access for at least 35 per cent of the African population within 20 years, especially in rural areas;
(ii) Provide support to implement other initiatives on energy, including the promotion of cleaner and more efficient use of natural gas and increased use of renewable energy, and to improve energy efficiency and access to advanced energy technologies, including cleaner fossil fuel technologies, particularly in rural and peri-urban areas;
(k) Assist African countries in mobilizing adequate resources for their adaptation needs relating to the adverse effects of climate change, extreme weather events, sea level rise and climate variability, and assist in developing national climate change strategies and mitigation programmes, and continue to take actions to mitigate the adverse effects on climate change in Africa, consistent with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change;
(l) Support African efforts to develop affordable transport systems and infrastructure that promote sustainable development and connectivity in Africa;
(m) Further to paragraph 42 above, address the poverty affecting mountain communities in Africa;
(n) Provide financial and technical support for afforestation and reforestation in Africa and to build capacity for sustainable forest management, including combating deforestation and measures to improve the policy and legal framework of the forest sector.
63. Provide financial and technical support for Africa's efforts to implement the Convention to Combat Desertification at the national level and integrate indigenous knowledge systems into land and natural resources management practices, as appropriate, and improve extension services to rural communities and promote better land and watershed management practices, including through improved agricultural practices that address land degradation, in order to develop capacity for the implementation of national programmes.
64. Mobilize financial and other support to develop and strengthen health systems that aim to:
(a) Promote equitable access to health-care services;
(b) Make available necessary drugs and technology in a sustainable and affordable manner to fight and control communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, and trypanosomiasis, as well as non-communicable diseases, including those caused by poverty;
(c) Build capacity of medical and paramedical personnel;
(d) Promote indigenous medical knowledge, as appropriate, including traditional medicine;
(e) Research and control Ebola disease.
65. Deal effectively with natural disasters and conflicts, including their humanitarian and environmental impacts, recognizing that conflicts in Africa have hindered, and in many cases obliterated, both the gains and efforts aimed at sustainable development, with the most vulnerable members of society, particularly women and children, being the most impacted victims, through efforts and initiatives, at all levels, to:
(a) Provide financial and technical assistance to strengthen the capacities of African countries, including institutional and human capacity, including at the local level, for effective disaster management, including observation and early warning systems, assessments, prevention, preparedness, response and recovery;
(b) Provide support to African countries to enable them to better deal with the displacement of people as a result of natural disasters and conflicts and put in place rapid response mechanisms;
(c) Support Africa's efforts for the prevention and resolution, management and mitigation of conflicts and its early response to emerging conflict situations to avert tragic humanitarian consequences;
(d) Provide support to refugee host countries in rehabilitating infrastructure and environment, including ecosystems and habitats, that were damaged in the process of receiving and settling refugees.
66. Promote integrated water resources development and optimize the upstream and downstream benefits therefrom, the development and effective management of water resources across all uses and the protection of water quality and aquatic ecosystems, including through initiatives at all levels, to:
(a) Provide access to potable domestic water, hygiene education and improved sanitation and waste management at the household level through initiatives to encourage public and private investment in water supply and sanitation that give priority to the needs of the poor within stable and transparent national regulatory frameworks provided by Governments, while respecting local conditions involving all concerned stakeholders and monitoring the performance and improving the accountability of public institutions and private companies; and develop critical water supply, reticulation and treatment infrastructure, and build capacity to maintain and manage systems to deliver water and sanitation services in both rural and urban areas;
(b) Develop and implement integrated river basin and watershed management strategies and plans for all major water bodies, consistent with paragraph 25 above;
(c) Strengthen regional, subregional and national capacities for data collection and processing and for planning, research, monitoring, assessment and enforcement, as well as arrangements for water resource management;
(d) Protect water resources, including groundwater and wetland ecosystems, against pollution, and, in cases of the most acute water scarcity, support efforts for developing non-conventional water resources, including the energy-efficient, cost-effective and sustainable desalination of seawater, rainwater harvesting and recycling of water.
67. Achieve significantly improved sustainable agricultural productivity and food security in furtherance of the agreed Millennium development goals, including those contained in the Millennium Declaration, in particular to halve by 2015 the proportion of people who suffer from hunger, including through initiatives at all levels to:
(a) Support the development and implementation of national policies and programmes, including research programmes and development plans of African countries to regenerate their agricultural sector and sustainably develop their fisheries, and increase investment in infrastructure, technology and extension services, according to country needs. African countries should be in the process of developing and implementing food security strategies, within the context of national poverty eradication programmes, by 2005;
(b) Promote and support efforts and initiatives to secure equitable access to land tenure and clarify resource rights and responsibilities, through land and tenure reform processes that respect the rule of law and are enshrined in national law, and provide access to credit for all, especially women, and that enable economic and social empowerment and poverty eradication as well as efficient and ecologically sound utilization of land and that enable women producers to become decision makers and owners in the sector, including the right to inherit land;
(c) Improve market access for goods, including goods originating from African countries, in particular least developed countries, within the framework of the Doha Ministerial Declaration, without prejudging the outcome of the World Trade Organization negotiations, as well as within the framework of preferential agreements;
(d) Provide support for African countries to improve regional trade and economic integration between African countries. Attract and increase investment in regional market infrastructure;
(e) Support livestock development programmes aimed at progressive and effective control of animal diseases.
68. Achieve sound management of chemicals, with particular focus on hazardous chemicals and wastes, inter alia, through initiatives to assist African countries in elaborating national chemical profiles and regional and national frameworks and strategies for chemical management and establishing chemical focal points.
69. Bridge the digital divide and create digital opportunity in terms of access infrastructure and technology transfer and application through integrated initiatives for Africa. Create an enabling environment to attract investment, accelerate existing and new programmes and projects to connect essential institutions and stimulate the adoption of information communication technologies in government and commerce programmes and other aspects of national economic and social life.
70. Support Africa's efforts to attain sustainable tourism that contributes to social, economic and infrastructure development through the following measures:
(a) Implementing projects at the local, national and subregional levels, with specific emphasis on marketing African tourism products, such as adventure tourism, ecotourism and cultural tourism;
(b) Establishing and supporting national and cross-border conservation areas to promote ecosystem conservation according to the ecosystem approach, and to promote sustainable tourism;
(c) Respecting local traditions and cultures and promoting the use of indigenous knowledge in natural resource management and ecotourism;
(d) Assisting host communities in managing their tourism projects for maximum benefit, while limiting negative impact on their traditions, culture and environment;
(e) Support the conservation of Africa's biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilization of genetic resources, in accordance with commitments that countries have under biodiversity-related agreements to which they are parties, including such agreements as the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, as well as regional biodiversity agreements.
71. Support African countries in their efforts to implement the Habitat Agenda and the Istanbul Declaration through initiatives to strengthen national and local institutional capacities in the areas of sustainable urbanization and human settlements, provide support for adequate shelter and basic services and the development of efficient and effective governance systems in cities and other human settlements and strengthen, inter alia, the joint programme on managing water for African cities of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme and the United Nations Environment Programme.

http://www.un.org/esa/sustdev/documents/WSSD_POI_PD/English/POIChapter8.htm

List of Environmental Organizations



Environmental and Conservation Organizations


AFRICA ANIMAL PROTECTION NETWORK (Africa APN) - www.africaanimal.org


AFRICA, GREENPEACE INTERNATIONAL - www.greenpeace.org/international/campaigns/forests/africa/


AFRICA AND MADAGASCAR, CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL - www.conservation.org/explore/africa_madagascar/Pages/overview.aspx


AFRICA NETWORK FOR ANIMAL WELFARE (ANAW) [Kenya] - www.anaw.org


AFRICA, WILDLIFE CONSERVATION SOCIETY - www.wcs.org/where-we-work/africa.aspx


AFRICAN ASSOCIATION OF ZOOS & AQUARIA (PAAZAB) - www.paazab.com


AFRICAN BIODIVERSITY NETWORK (ABN) - www.africanbiodiversity.org


AFRICAN BIRD CLUB - www.africanbirdclub.org


AFRICAN CENTRE FOR TECHNOLOGY STUDIES (ACTS) [Kenya] - www.acts.or.ke


AFRICAN CIVIL SOCIETY NETWORK ON WATER AND SANITATION (ANEW) - www.anewafrica.net


AFRICAN CONSERVATION CENTRE (ACC) [Kenya] - www.conservationafrica.org


AFRICAN CONSERVATION FOUNDATION (ACT) - www.africanconservation.org


AFRICAN ELEPHANT PROGRAM, U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE - www.fws.gov/international/DIC/species/afe/african_elephant.html


AFRICAN ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION NETWORK (AEIN) - www.necz.org.zm/aein/
and
www.unep.org/dewa/africa/aeoprocess/aein/aein.asp


AFRICAN FUND FOR ENDANGERED WILDLIFE (AFEW) - www.gcci.org/afew/afew.html


AFRICAN JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT (AJEAM/RAGEE) - www.ajeam-ragee.org


AFRICAN NETWORK OF ENVIRONMENTAL JOURNALISTS (ANEJ) - www.unep.org/roa/Projects_Programmes/African_Network_Environmental_Journalists/index.asp


AFRICAN PREDATOR CONSERVATION RESEARCH ORGANIZATION (APCRO) - www.apcro.org


AFRICAN WATER ISSUES RESEARCH UNIT (AWIRU), UNIVERISITY OF PRETORIA - www.awiru.co.za


AFRICAN WILD DOG CONSERVANCY (AWD Conservancy) - www.awdconservancy.org


AFRICAN WIND ENERGY ASSOCIATION (AfriWEA) - www.afriwea.org


AFRICAN WILDLIFE FOUNDATION (AWF) - www.awf.org


AFRICAT FOUNDATION [Namibia] - www.africat.org


AFRICA2020.COM, ENVIRONMENT - www.mathaba.net/africa2020/environment


AFRI-LEO FOUNDATION INTERNATIONAL, NAMIBIA - www.afrileo-foundation.org


AFRITRUST - www.afritrust.com


ALLAFRICA.COM, ENVIRONMENT – TOP NEWS - http://allafrica.com/environment


ANIMAL RIGHTS AFRICA [South Africa] - www.animalrightsafrica.org


APE ACTION AFRICA [Cameroon] - www.apeactionafrica.org


BUDONGO CONSERVATION FIELD STATION (BCFS) [Uganda] - www.budongo.org


CENTER FOR EDUCATION, RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION OF PRIMATES AND NATURE (CERCOPAN) [Nigeria] -
www.cercopan.org


CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT (CED) [Cameroon] - www.cedcameroun.org


CENTRE FOR AFRICAN FAMILY STUDIES (CAFS) [Kenya] - www.cafs.org


CHEETAH CONSERVATION FUND (CCF) [Namibia] - www.cheetah.org


CHIMFUNSHI WILDLIFE ORPHANAGE [Zambia] - www.chimfunshi.org.za


CHIMPANZEE REHABILITATION TRUST (CRT) [Gambia] - www.chimprehab.com


CHIMPANZEE SANCTUARY & WILDLIFE CONSERVATION TRUST (CSWCT) [Uganda] - www.ngambaisland.org


CHIPANGALI WILDLIFE ORPHANAGE [Zimbabwe] - www.chipangali.com


THE DAVID SHELDRICK WILDLIFE TRUST [Kenya] - www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org


DIAN FOSSEY GORILLA FUND INTERNATIONAL (DFGFI) - www.gorillafund.org


EARTHLIFE AFRICA (ELA) - www.earthlife.org.za


EARTHWIRE AFRICA - www.earthwire.org/africa/


EAST AFRICAN WILDLIFE SOCIETY (EAWLS) - www.eawildlife.org


EASTERN AFRICA ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK (EAEN) - www.interconnection.org/eaen/


ECO–ETHICS INTERNATIONAL – KENYA (EEI – Kenya) - www.ecoethics-kenya.org


ENDANGERED WILDLIFE TRUST (EWT) [South Africa] - www.ewt.org.za


ENVIROCARE [Tanzania] - www.envirocaretz.com


ENVIRONMENT LAISON CENTER INTERNATIONAL (ELCI) - www.elci.org


ENVIRONMENTAL LAW INSTITUTE, AFRICA PROGRAM - www.eli.org/Program_Areas/africa.cfm


ENVIRONMENTAL RIGHTS ACTION (ERA), FRIENDS OF THE EARTH, NIGERIA - www.eraction.org


FARMER’S CENTER OF INITIATIVES AND RESEARCH FOR THE ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (CIRPED) [Senegal] - www.interconnection.org/cirped/


FRIENDS OF THE EARTH SIERRA LEONE (FOESL) - www.onesky.ca/foesl/


FRIENDS OF LAKE VICTORIA (OSIENALA) - www.osienala.org


THE GALLMANN AFRICA CONSERVANCY - www.gallmannkenya.org


GREEN AFRICA FOUNDATION (GAF) [Kenya] - www.greenafricafoundation.org


GRASSLAND SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN AFRICA (GSSA) - www.gssa.co.za


GREAT APES SURVIVAL PARTNERSHIP (GRASP) [Kenya] - www.unep.org/grasp/


GREEN BELT MOVEMENT (GBM) [Kenya] - www.greenbeltmovement.org


GROUNDWORK [South Africa] - www.groundwork.org.za


HOMELESS ANIMALS PROTECTION SOCIETY (HAPS) [Ethiopia] - www.haps-eth.org.et


INFORSE – AFRICA, INTERNATIONAL NETWORK FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY - www.inforse.org/africa/


INTERNATIONAL OCEAN INSTITUTE – SOUTHERN AFRICA - www.ioisa.org.za


IUCN, BOTSWANA COUNTRY OFFICE - www.iucnbot.bw


KENYA BIRDING - www.kenyabirding.org


KENYA SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION & CARE OF ANIMALS (KSPCA) - www.kspca-kenya.org


LES AMIS DE LA TERRE – TOGO (ADT-Togo) - www.amiterre.tg


LIVING WITH ELEPHANTS FOUNDATION [Botswana] - www.livingwithelephants.org


NAMIBIA NATURE FOUNDATION - www.nnf.org.na


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENVIRONMENTALISTS IN UGANDA (NAPE Uganda) - www.nape.or.ug


NATIONAL COUNCIL OF SPCAs (NSPCA) [South Africa] - www.nspca.co.za


NATURE KENYA – THE EAST AFRICA NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY - www.naturekenya.org


NATURE SEYCHELLES - www.natureseychelles.org


NIGER DELTA FUND INITIATIVE (NDFI), EARTH RIGHTS INSTITUTE - www.earthrights.net/nigeria/


PADELIA – PARTNERSHIP FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL LAW AND INSTITUTIONS IN AFRICA, UN ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME - www.unep.org/Padelia/


PAN AFRICAN SANCTUARY ALLIANCE (PASA) - www.pasaprimates.org


PLANTZAFRICA.COM - www.plantzafrica.com


RHINO ARK [Kenya] - www.rhinoark.org


RHINO FUND UGANDA (RFU) - www.rhinofund.org


SAVE EARTH NIGERIA (SEN) - www.senigus.interconnection.org


SAVE THE ELEPHANTS [Kenya] - www.savetheelephants.org


SOUTHERN AFRICA ENVIRONMENT PROJECT - www.saep.org


SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE (SDI) [Liberia] - www.sdiliberia.org


SUSTAINABLE ENERGY AFRICA (SEA) - www.sustainable.org.za


SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN AFRICA (SESSA) - www.sessa.org.za


TACUGAMA CHIMPANZI SANCTUARY [Sierra Leone] - www.tacugama.com


TUSK - www.tusk.org


UGANDA WILDLIFE EDUCATION CENTRE (UWEC) - www.uweczoo.org


UNITED NATIONS ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME (UNEP) [Kenya] - www.unep.org


UNITED NATIONS ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME (UNEP), REGIONAL OFFICE FOR AFRICA (ROA) - www.unep.org/roa/


WASTES MANAGEMENT SOCIETY OF NIGERIA (WAMASON) - www.wamason.org


WILDLANDS CONSERVATION TRUST [South Africa] - www.wildlands.co.za


WILDLIFE DIRECT - http://wildlifedirect.org


WILDLIFE AND ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY OF SOUTH AFRICA (WESSA) - www.wildlifesociety.org.za


WILDLIFE & ENVIRONMENT ZIMBABWE (WEZ) - www.zimwild.org


WILDLIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIETY OF MALAWI - www.wildlifemalawi.org


WORLD AGROFORESTRY CENTRE (ICRAF) - www.worldagroforestry.org


WWF SOUTH AFRICA - www.panda.org.za


WWF – AFRICA & MADAGASCAR - www.worldwildlife.org/wildplaces/africa.cfm


YONGE NAWE ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION GROUP [Swaziland] - www.yongenawe.com


YOUTH FOR CONSERVATION (YfC) [Kenya] - www.youthforconservation.org


ZIMBABWE CONSERVATION TASK FORCE (ZCTF) - http://zctf.net or www.zctf.mweb.co.zw


THE ZAMBEZI SOCIETY - www.zamsoc.org


Government Environmental & Conservation Agencies

Directory of National Government Environmental Agencies

AFRICA AND THE MIDDLE EAST, DIRECTORY OF WEB SITES OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENCIES OF THE WORLD, INTERNATIONAL NETWORK FOR ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND ENFORCEMENT (INECE) - www.inece.org/links_pages/onlineresourcesEnvironmentalagencies.html#africa


Algeria

NATIONAL OFFICE OF METEOROLOGY - www.meteo.dz



Ascension Island
[Dependency of Saint Helena and Overseas Territory of the United Kingdom]

ASCENSION CONSERVATION - www.ascensionconservation.org.ac/index.htm



Benin

NATIONAL METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE - www.meteo-benin.net



Botswana

BOTSWANA DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGICAL SERVICES (DMS) - www.mewt.gov.bw/DMS/index.php

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS (DEA) - www.envirobotswana.gov.bw

DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY AND RANGE RESOURCES (DFRR) - www.mewt.gov.bw/DFRR/index.php

DEPARTMENT OF WASTE MANAGEMENT & POLLUTION CONTROL (DWMPC) - www.mewt.gov.bw/DWMPC/index.php

DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE & NATIONAL PARKS (DWNP) - www.mewt.gov.bw/DWNP/index.php

MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT, WILDLIGE AND TOURISM (MEWT) - www.mewt.gov.bw



Cameroon

NATIONAL METEOROLOGICAL DIRECTORATE (DMN) - www.meteo-cameroon.net



Congo

NATIONAL METEOROLOGY DIRECTORATE - www.meteo-congo-brazza.net



Democratic Republic of the Congo

NATIONAL AGENCY OF METEOROLOGY AND TELEDETECTION BY SATELLITE (METTELSAT) -
www.meteo-congo-kinshasa.net



Egypt

English Language Home Page of Primary Environmental Agency:
EGYPTIAN ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AGENCY (EEAA), MINISTRY OF STATE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS - www.eeaa.gov.eg/English/main/about.asp

EGYPTIAN ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AGENCY (EEAA), MINISTRY OF STATE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS - www.eeaa.gov.eg

EGYPTIAN METEOROLOGICAL AUTHORITY (EMA) - http://nwp.gov.eg

MINISTRY OF WATER RESOURCES AND IRRIGATION - www.mwri.gov.eg

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF OCEANOGRAPHY AND FISHERIES (NIOF) - www.niof.sci.eg

NATIONAL WATER RESEARCH CENTER (NWRC) - www.nwrc.gov.eg



Ethiopia

AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION DEPARTMENT, THE ETHIOPIAN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMISSION (ESTC) - www.telecom.net.et/~estc/departments/agriculture.htm

CLEANER PRODUCTION CENTRE (CPC), ESTC - www.telecom.net.et/~estc/cpc.htm

DEPARTMENT OF MINES, WATER & ENERGY, ESTC - www.telecom.net.et/~estc/departments/water.htm

DISASTER PREVENTION AND PREPAREDNESS COMMISSION (DPPC) - www.dppc.gov.et

ETHIOPIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AUTHORITY (EPA) - www.epa.gov.et/EPAHome.htm

ETHIOPIAN INSTITUTE OF AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH (EIAR) - www.eiar.gov.et

ETHIOPIAN MAPPING AUTHORITY - www.telecom.net.et/~ema/

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF ETHIOPIA - http://geoinfo.uneca.org/geoinfo/ethiopia/gse.html

NATIONAL METEOROLOGICAL SERVICES AGENCY - http://geoinfo.uneca.org/geoinfo/ethiopia/nmsa.html

NATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION AUTHORITY (NRPA), ESTC - www.telecom.net.et/~estc/CentresAuth/nrpa.htm


Gabon

METEO GABON - www.meteo-gabon.net



Ghana

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) - www.epa.gov.gh



Guinea

NATIONAL DIRECTORATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT - www.mirinet.com/gn_env



Kenya

KENYA FORESTRY RESEARCH INSTITUTE (KEFRI) - www.kefri.org

KENYA FOREST SERVICE (KFS) - www.kenyaforestservice.org

KENYA MARINE AND FISHERIES RESEARCH INSITUTE (KMFRI) - www.kmfri.co.ke

KENYA METEOROLOGICAL DEPARTMENT - www.meteo.go.ke

KENYA WILDLIFE SERVICE (KWS) - www.kws.org

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE - www.kilimo.go.ke

MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT AND MINERAL RESOURCES (MEMR) - www.environment.go.ke

MINISTRY OF LANDS AND SETTLEMENT - www.ardhi.go.ke

MINISTRY OF WATER AND IRRIGATION - www.water.go.ke

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY (NEMA) - www.nema.go.ke



Lesotho

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT - www.mtec.gov.ls/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=55&Itemid=77

LESOTHO METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE (LMS) - www.lesmet.org.ls

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SECURITY - www.lesotho.gov.ls/agric

MINISTRY OF FORESTRY AND LAND RECLAMATION - www.lesotho.gov.ls/forestry

MINISTRY OF TOURISM, ENVIRONMENT AND CULTURE - www.mtec.gov.ls



Libya

GENERAL PEOPLES COMMITTEE FOR HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT - www.health.gov.ly

LIBYAN NATIONAL METEOROLOGICAL CENTER - www.lnmc.ly



Madagascar

MINISTERE DE L’AGRICULTURE, DE L’ELEVAGE ET DE LA PECHE (MAEP) - www.maep.gov.mg
MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND FORESTS (MEF) - www.meeft.gov.mg

MINISTRY OF WATER - www.mineau.gov.mg



Malawi

DEPARTMENT OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND METEOROLOGICAL SERVICES - www.metmalawi.com


Mali

OBSERVATOIRE DU MARCHE AGRICOLE - www.oma.gov.ml



Mauritius

DEMOGRAPHY / EVALUATION UNIT - www.gov.mu/portal/site/evalSite

MAURITIUS METEOROLOGICAL SERVICES (MMS) - http://metservice.intnet.mu

MINISTRY OF AGRO INDUSTRY, FOOD PRODUCTION AND SECURITY - www.gov.mu/portal/site/MOASite

MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT AND NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT UNIT - www.gov.mu/portal/site/menvsite

Additional web site address of the same site - http://environment.gov.mu

MINISTRY OF HEALTH AND QUALITY OF LIFE - www.gov.mu/portal/site/mohsite

MINISTRY OF HOUSING & LANDS - www.gov.mu/portal/site/housing

MINISTRY OF RENEWABLE ENERGY AND PUBLIC UTILITIES - www.gov.mu/portal/site/mpusite
WASTE WATER MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY - http://wma.gov.mu



Morocco

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT - www.minenv.gov.ma

NATIONAL METEOROLOGICAL DIRECTORATE - www.marocmeteo.ma

NATIONAL OFFICE OF POTABLE WATER (ONEP) - www.onep.org.ma



Mozambique

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF METEOROLOGY - www.inam.gov.mz



Namibia

MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM (MET) - www.met.gov.na

NAMIBIA METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE - www.meteona.com



Niger

DIRECTION DE LA METEOROLOGIE NATIONALE DU NIGER - www.meteo-niger.net



Nigeria

NATIONAL AGENCY FOR FOOD, DRUG ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL - www.nafdacnigeria.org
NATIONAL POPULATION COMMISSION (NPC) - www.population.gov.ng



Rwanda

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND ANIMAL RESOURCES (MINAGRI) - www.minagri.gov.rw

NATIONAL AIDS CONTROL COMMISSION (CNLS) - www.cnls.gov.rw

RWANDA ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY (REMA) - www.rema.gov.rw


Saint Helena
[Overseas Territory of the United Kingdom]

HERITAGE, TOURISM OFFICIAL WEBSITE, GOVERNMENT OF ST. HELENA - www.discoveroursecret.co.sh/pages/heritage.html

NATURE, TOURISM OFFICIAL WEBSITE, GOVERNMENT OF ST. HELENA - www.discoveroursecret.co.sh/pages/nature.html

ST. HELENA NATIONAL TRUST - www.nationaltrust.org.sh



Senegal

MINISTERE DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT ET DE LA PROTECTION DE LA NATURE - www.environnement.gouv.sn

NATIONAL METEOROLOGICAL DIRECTORATE - www.meteo-senegal.net



Seychelles

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT - www.virtualseychelles.sc/gover/menr-de.htm

MINISTRY OF LAND USE AND HABITAT - www.virtualseychelles.sc/gover/mluh.htm

DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES - www.virtualseychelles.sc/gover/menr-dnr.htm

SEYCHELLES CENTRE FOR MARINE RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY – MARINE PARKS AUTHORITY (SCMRT-MPA) - www.scmrt-mpa.sc

SEYCHELLES FISHING AUTHORITY (SFA) - www.virtualseychelles.sc/gover/para_sfa.htm

SEYCHELLES METEOROLOGICAL SERVICES - www.pps.gov.sc/meteo/



Sierra Leone

ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION, MINISTRY OF HEALTH AND SANITATION - www.health.sl/drwebsite/publish/environsanitation.shtml



South Africa

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL (ARC) - www.arc.agric.za

COUNCIL FOR GEOSCIENCE - www.geoscience.org.za

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES - www.daff.gov.za

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS - www.environment.gov.za

DEPARTMENT OF WATER AFFAIRS (DWAF) - www.dwaf.gov.za

NATIONAL BIODIVERSITY INSTITUTE (SANBI) - www.nbi.co.za

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (DoA) - www.nda.agric.za

NATIONAL NUCLEAR REGULATOR (NNR) - www.nnr.co.za

PLANTZAFRICA.COM - www.plantzafrica.com

SOUTH AFRICAN BIODIVERSITY INFORMATION FACILITY (SABIF) - www.sabif.ac.za

SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL ANTARCTIC PROGRAM (SANAP) - http://home.intekom.com/sanae

SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL BIODIVERSITY INSTITUTE (SANBI) - www.nbi.ac.za

SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL PARKS (SANParks) - www.sanparks.org

SOUTH AFRICAN WEATHER SERVICE - www.weathersa.co.za

WATER RESEARCH COMMISSION (WRC) - www.wrc.org.za



Sudan

MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT, WILDLIFE CONSERVATION & TOURISM, AUTONOMOUS GOVERNMENT OF SOUTHERN SUDAN - www.mewctgoss.org

SUDAN METEOROLOGICAL AUTHORITY - www.ersad.gov.sd



Swaziland

SWAZILAND ENVIRONMENT AUTHORITY (SEA) - www.environment.gov.sz

SWAZILAND METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE - www.swazimet.gov.sz

SWAZILAND NATIONAL TRUST COMMISSION - www.sntc.org.sz/intro.html



Tanzania

AGRICULTURE, UNITED REPUBLIC OF TANZANIA - www.tanzania.go.tz/agriculturef.html

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE & FOOD SECURITY - www.tanzania.go.tz/agriculture.htm

MINISTRY OF NATURAL RESOURCES & TOURISM - www.tanzania.go.tz/natural.htm

MINISTRY OF WATER & LIVESTOCK DEVELOPMENT - www.tanzania.go.tz/water.htm

NATURAL RESOURCES, UNITED REPUBLIC OF TANZANIA - www.tanzania.go.tz/naturalresources.html

TANZANIA FOOD AND NUTRITION CENTRE (TFNC) - www.tanzania.go.tz/tfnc.html

TANZANIA METEOROLOGICAL AGENCY - www.meteo.go.tz

TANZANIA NATIONAL PARKS - www.tanzaniaparks.com

WATER, UNITED REPUBLIC OF TANZANIA - www.tanzania.go.tz/waterf.html



Togo

SERVICE DE LA METEOROLOGIE NATIONALE DU TOGO - www.meteo-togo.net



Tristan da Cunha
[Dependency of Saint Helena and Overseas Territory of the United Kingdom]

A TRISTAN ISLANDS TOUR, THE TRISTAN DA CUNHA WEBSITE - www.tristandc.com/tour.php

CONSERVATION NEWS, THE TRISTAN DA CUNHA WEBSITE - www.tristandc.com/newsconservation.php

TRISTAN DA CUNHA [not a government agency] - www.sthelena.se/tristan/tristan.htm

WILDLIFE AND CONSERVATION, THE TRISTAN DA CUNHA WEBSITE - www.tristandc.com/wildlife.php



Tunisia

MINISTERE DE L’AGRICULTURE ET DES RESSOURCES HYDRAULIGUES - www.ministeres.tn/html/ministeres/agriculture.html

MINISTERE DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT ET LE DEVELOPPEMENT DURABLE - www.environnement.nat.tn

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF METEOROLOGY - www.meteo.tn

THE NATIONAL SANITATION UTILITY (ONAS) - www.onas.nat.tn



Uganda

DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY - www.meteo-uganda.net

MINISTRY OF WATER AND ENVIRONMENT - www.mwe.go.ug

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY (NEMA) - www.nemaug.org

UGANDA WILDLIFE AUTHORITY (UWA) - www.ugandawildlife.org or www.uwa.or.ug



Zambia

ENVIRONMENTAL COUNCIL OF ZAMBIA (ECZ) - www.necz.org.zm

ZAMBIA AGRICULTURE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (ZARI) - www.zari.gov.zm

ZAMBIA DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY -
www.zamnet.zm/siteindex/Links/weather.html



Zimbabwe

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES - www.water.gov.zw/Departs/water.htm

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE - www.moa.gov.zw

MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM - www.met.gov.zw

MINISTRY OF STATE FOR WATER RESOURCES AND INFRASTRUCTURAL
DEVELOPMENT - www.water.gov.zw

ZIMBABWE NATIONAL WATER AUTHORITY (ZINWA) - www.zinwa.co.zw

ZIMBABWE PARKS AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY - www.zimparks.com

Climate change and rainforests

Ethiopia - Sustainable Land Management Project
Environment, Forests & Forestry Ethiopia Sub-Saharan Africa
'The objective of the Sustainable Land Management Project (SLM) in Ethiopia is to reduce land degradation in agricultural landscapes and to improve the agricultural productivity of smallholder farmers.

There are three components to the project. The first component is the watershed management. It is aimed at supporting scaling up of best management practices in sustainable land management practices and technologies for smallholder farmers in the high potential/food secure areas that are increasingly becoming vulnerable to land degradation and food insecurity. The second component is the rural land certification and administration. The objective of this component is to expand the coverage and enhance the government's land certification project, with the aim of strengthening land tenure security for smallholder farmers. The third component is the project management. The focus of this component is to provide financial and technical assistance to the federal ministry of agriculture and rural development and local government units responsible for sustainable land management to effectively support coordination and implementation of the SLM project.'

http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2008/04/10/000334955_20080410050936/Rendered/PDF/429270PAD0P10710and0IDAR20081007211.pdf
WHAT ARE RAINFORESTS?
Tropical rainforests are forests with tall trees, warm climate, and lots of rain. In some rainforests it rains more than one inch every day! Rainforests are found in Africa, Asia, Australia, and Central and South America. The largest rainforest in the world is the Amazon rainforest

http://rainforests.mongabay.com/

AFRICA: What will we eat in the future?
size=1 width="100%" noshade style='color:black' align=center>
Photo: Flickr
Drought-tolerant crop varieties will be hard to come by
JOHANNESBURG, 17 June 2009 (IRIN) - It will take at least ten years to develop a variety of staple grain that will survive in the climates caused by global warming in most parts of Africa, and the continent has less than two decades in which to do it, warn the authors of a new study.

"The countries have to start developing varieties now, but many of these countries don't have breeding programmes," said Luigi Guarino, one of three authors of a study to be published on 19 June in the US journal, Global Environmental Change. "This study, we hope, at least raises the flag." The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), an international scientific body, has predicted that food production in Africa could halve by 2020 as global warming pushes temperatures up and droughts become more intense.

The new study by researchers at Stanford University's Program on Food Security and the Environment, in the US, and the Rome-based Global Crop Diversity Trust, noted that "For a majority of Africa's farmers, warming will rapidly take climate not only beyond the range of their personal experience, but also beyond the experience of farmers within their own country."
For a majority of Africa's farmers, warming will rapidly take climate not only beyond the range of their personal experience, but also beyond the experience of farmers within their own country

Guarino, a Senior Science Coordinator at the Global Crop diversity Trust, pointed out that many farmers could find staple crop varieties in other African countries, where current temperatures and conditions were similar to what they might experience in future. "For example, farmers in Lesotho [with one of the coolest climates in Africa] could find maize varieties grown in parts of Mali [one of the hottest countries in Africa] now, which would be tolerant to the very high temperatures they would face in another 20 years." Six countries in the Sahel - Senegal, Chad, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger and Sierra Leone, the hottest in Africa - are of major concern to the researchers, as they will face conditions unlike any currently encountered by farmers in the continent. "Of course, parts of these countries will never be able to grow maize [which is more heat sensitive]," he said, and would have to settle for the "drought-tolerant maize, which is sorghum". Many parts of Africa would no longer be able to grow anything.

Guarino said it was possible to develop crop varieties in simulated conditions, based on projections for the Sahel belt, but very few traditional primary cereal crops - African varieties of maize, millet and sorghum - selected by farmers over the centuries for their unique suitability to local growing conditions were available in genebanks. The researchers found that ten African countries, including Sudan, Nigeria, Cameroon and Mozambique, had current growing conditions very similar to those many other countries would soon face, but few of the crop varieties cultivated in the countries were found in major genebanks. In an earlier study, the Stanford University researchers projected that maize production, southern Africa's staple food, could drop by as much as 30 percent in another two decades. Cary Fowler, head of the Global Crop Diversity Trust, said climate change called for closer collaboration, sharing of resources and more investment. The researchers' call to help African countries came during the global debate over a legally binding funding mechanism to help poor countries adapt to climate change at the recent talks in Bonn, Germany. jk/he
Themes: (IRIN) Early Warning, (IRIN) Environment, (IRIN) Food Security
[ENDS]
Report can be found online at:http://www.irinnews.org/Report.aspx?ReportId=84892

Weather Monitoring Stations Will Help Africa Adapt To Climate Change

By Lisa Schlein Geneva18 June 2009

A new initiative has been launched in Geneva to radically improve Africa's weather monitoring network. Its aim is to help people across the continent adapt to the impact of climate change. The Global Humanitarian Forum headed by former UN Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, the United Nations World Meteorological Organization and leading mobile communications companies are behind the initiative dubbed "Weather Info for All." "Global warming is causing an ever increasing number of extreme weather events that affect the word's poorest and most vulnerable communities. The change means that age-old knowledge passed from one generation to the next can no longer be relied upon to protect peoples lives and livelihoods," explained a video presentation.


And, that is where science and the ability to better forecast the weather become increasingly important."The initiative brings together the technical expertise and resources of private and public bodies to help people adapt to the effects of climate change," said Kofi Annan.Former UN Secretary-General, Kofi Annan is President of the Global Humanitarian Forum, which is spearheading the "Weather Info for All" initiative.

He says climate change is not a threat waiting to happen. He says climate change already is altering traditional weather and rainfall patterns and threatening the health, security and livelihoods of millions of people in Africa. He says Africa is the continent that will be hit hardest by the impact of climate change. Yet, he notes Africa badly lacks the facilities to effectively monitor ground level weather data."As a first important step, we urgently need to scale up both the quantity and quality of information about weather patterns in Africa," he said. "This will enable farmers to make informed decisions in planning the seeding and harvesting of crops. It will also enable accurate warnings to be given about extreme and violent weather conditions."The initiative involves a unique public-private partnership. Swedish telecom giant Ericsson will install weather stations at new and existing mobile network sites throughout Africa.

And, Zain, one of Africa's largest telecommunications companies, will provide band width to send raw data and disseminate forecasts and early warnings.Both companies are in the process of installing 19 automatic weather stations in new wireless network sites in the Lake Victoria Region. And, in the last quarter of the year, hundreds of new installations will be made in East Africa. The goal is to install up to 5,000 new observation stations across Africa over the coming years. Members of the initiative say huge benefits in mitigating climate change will be achieved for a relatively small amount of money. They estimate the cost of installing 5,000 new weather stations is a relatively modest $30 million. http://www.voanews.com/english/archive/2009-06/2009-06-18-voa46.cfm?CFID=267912270&CFTOKEN=22412058&jsessionid=de30365460f1a3f66e172b31356266d4dfb6

Monday, 27 July 2009

Concours de photos Solidaires du monde / Planète Jeunes sur le thème de la solidarité


L'Agence Française de Développement et le magazine Planète Jeunes s’associent à l’occasion d’un concours de photos sur la thématique de la solidarité. A cette occasion, nous serions ravis que vous le relayiez autour de vous afin de faire participer de nombreux jeunes à ce concours.

Ce concours est ouvert à tous les jeunes de moins de 25 ans habitant dans les pays où est diffusé Planète Jeunes, à savoir : Bénin, Burkina Faso, Cameroun, Cap Vert, Congo Brazza, Côte d’Ivoire, Gabon, Guadeloupe, Ghana, Guinée, Guyane, Haïti, la Réunion, Madagascar, Mali Martinique, Mauritanie, Mayotte, Niger, Nouvelle Calédonie, République Centrafricaine, République Démocratique du Congo, Rwanda, Sénégal, Tchad et Togo.

La participation est limitée à une seule photo par personne, accompagnée d’une légende mentionnant le lieu, la date et le sujet. Les mineurs sont soumis à la responsabilité parentale ou d’un représentant légal.
3 possibilités pour envoyer sa photo :
par courrier à Planète Jeunes – « Grand Prix Solidaires du monde » - 92 137 Issy-les-Moulineaux Cedex, France.
par mail à grand-prix@planete-jeunes.org
par téléphone portable au 00 33 6 08 70 52 56 (prix d’un MMS international)
Il est possible de participer jusqu’au 25 août.

Les photos seront jugées selon différents critères : esthétique (netteté, lumière, prise de vue), thématique (pertinence et originalité) et légende. Les gagnants seront désignés dans 3 catégories : photo envoyée par téléphone portable, photo prise à partir d'un appareil photo et photo prise par un appareil photo numérique. Concernant cette dernière, le grand prix sera attribué par les internautes de la plate-forme www.solidairesdumonde.org parmi 20 photos sélectionnées par le jury. Les internautes pourront voter pour leurs photos préférées à partir du 31 juillet.

Rendez-vous début septembre pour connaître le nom des gagnants !

Les photos des trois gagnants seront publiées dans le numéro de décembre du magazine Planète Jeunes et en simultané sur la plate-forme de blogs Solidaires du monde.
Les auteurs des clichés gagnants se verront récompensés de nombreux lots dont un ordinateur portable, un iPhone 3G ou encore un appareil photo numérique.

Vous pouvez retrouver ici le règlement du concours dans son intégralité (la date de fin de participation au concours a été repoussée au 25 août).

Nous comptons sur vous pour en parler autour de vous !

L’équipe Solidaires du monde

Gestion des Forets en Afrique

Gestion des Forets en Afrique

Les Approches Participatives dans la Gestion des Ecosystèmes

http://www.cifor.cgiar.org/publications/pdf_files/OccPapers/OP-23.pdf


Évolution du régime foncier des forêts en Afrique:promotion de la gestion forestière locale
En Afrique, les régimes fonciers des forêts se caractérisent principalement par la propriété publique, la majorité des forêts étant sous le contrôle et la gestion directs du gouvernement. Toutefois, des changements se produisent, notamment dans la gestion forestière qui passe de façon croissante de l’État aux communautés locales. Le présent article, fondé sur une étude entreprise récemment par la FAO (voir l’encadré, page suivante), examine certains exemples, et analyse les facteurs qui concourent ou
s’opposent au succès d’autres formes de régimes fonciers. Il examine les systèmes qui ont su répondre aux besoins locaux et soutenir la gestion durable des forêts
parce que la propriété était sûre et que adaptés, favorisant par là même la gestion forestière locale. Il met l’accent sur la sécurité de l’occupation comme base de
la gestion forestière durable.

ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/010/a1346f/a1346f03.pdf

Enseignements Tirés de la Gestion Durable des Forêts en Afrique
L’étendue et la situation des forêts en Afrique ont été quantifiées et décrites dans les récents rapports de la FAO sur ”L’Evaluation des Ressources Forestières du
Monde 2000”, “L’Etat des Forêts du Monde (2003)”, et ”l’Etude Prospective du Secteur Forestier en Afrique” (FOSA – 2003). Ces études et d’autres réalisées par
exemple par le Centre International pour la Recherche Forestière (CIFOR), le PNUE et l’IUCN mettent l’accent sur une situation peu reluisante des forêts africaines: les ressources forestières sont en train de diminuer et/ou sont mal gérées, les institutions sont faibles; les politiques, les lois, les régimes fonciers et les incitations économiques ne conduisent pas souvent à une gestion et à une utilisation durables des forêts; les gouvernements et les bailleurs de fonds semblent donner une faible priorité aux problèmes forestiers. Il en résulte que les contributions potentielles des forêts africaines à la réduction de la pauvreté, au développement économique et à l’équilibre écologique et hydraulique sont encore loin d’être réalisées.

http://www.ksla.se/sv/retrieve_file.asp?n=224

AFRIQUE DE L’OUEST :Des forêts communales pour mieux préserver les ressources Brahima OuédraogoMEGUET, Burkina Faso, 10 juil (IPS) - Harouna Sawadogo, l’un des membres du comité de gestion de la forêt communale de Méguet, une localité de l’ouest du Burkina Faso, est fier des 350 hectares qu’ils ont réussi à transformer en sanctuaire d’animaux et d’espèces végétales en voie de disparition.

«Nous avons choisi 16 personnes dont six femmes qui font la ronde chaque jour pour surveiller la forêt afin que personne n’y rentre», affirme à IPS, Sawadogo dont la localité est située à 145 kilomètres à l’est de Ouagadougou, la capitale burkinabé. «C’est seulement la peur des feux aux alentours qui oblige cette ronde», ajoute-t-il, visiblement heureux d’expliquer comment l’implication de la communauté a permis de réaliser un exemple de forêt communale. La forêt de Méguet a été découverte par le grand public lors du premier congrès des pays membres de la Communauté économique des Etats d’Afrique de l’ouest (CEDEAO) et du Cameroun, en vue de susciter et d’accompagner le développement des forêts communales dans ces pays.

La rencontre qui s’est déroulée fin-juin à Ouagadougou, était organisée par la Fédération des communes forestières de France (FNCOFOR) et placée sous l’égide de la CEDEAO. Elle s’inscrivait dans le contexte de la décentralisation et du transfert aux collectivités locales des compétences en matière de ressources naturelles. «C’était une forêt banale au départ et la commune, avec l’apport des partenaires du nord, ont travaillé pour en faire une forêt protégée après que les populations se sont organisées en comité de gestion avec l’aide des services des eaux et forêts», explique le ministre burkinabé de l’Environnement et du Cadre de Vie, Salifou Sawadogo.

La forêt appartient aux 20 villages de la commune de Méguet dont les populations s’occupent du reboisement et de l’introduction des espèces. La touffe (des plantes ayant bien poussé) a même fait revenir des animaux comme les biches et guibs ainsi que d’autres espèces de plantes qui avaient tendance à disparaître. «Nous nous sommes compris et personne n’y entre, pas de divagation d’animaux ni de coupe abusive de bois», affirme Harouna Sawadogo. Les communes vont jouer un rôle important dans la gestion des ressources forestières en vue d’accompagner la décentralisation qui est de plus en plus effective dans les pays de la CEDEAO, explique à IPS Léko, chargé de programme principal pour la forêt à la direction de l’environnement dans l’organisation régionale.

«Avec cette nouvelle approche de gestion de forêts, les transferts de compétences inscrits dans les textes de la décentralisation vont devenir réalité. Et avec ça, les plans de développement des communes vont accorder plus d’intérêt à la gestion des ressources forestières dans leur planification», ajoute Léko. «La commune constitue l’entité la plus proche des populations, donc des communautés locales». Les forêts constituent la principale source d’énergie domestique pour environ 80 pour cent des populations de la CEDEAO, mais également une source pour la pharmacopée traditionnelle, l’alimentation, et une source de revenu. La CEDEAO constate cependant que la dégradation des ressources forestières, dans la région, est l’un des plus fortes au monde car 900.000 hectares de forêts et terres boisées représentant 1,17 pour cent y sont détruits par an.

A l’issue de la rencontre, la CEDEAO a décidé d’apporter un appui politique et technique aux communes et faire un lobbying auprès des Etats, des partenaires techniques et financiers pour un soutien aux initiatives locales visant à préserver les forêts. «Ce qui est important, c’est cette volonté de commencer tout de suite, d’une façon concrète, à faire des démonstrations que la gestion des forêts communales peut se faire dans chacun des pays», déclare à IPS, Jean Claude Monin, président de la Fédération internationale des communes forestières et président de la FNCOFOR. La FNCOFOR regroupe près de 5.000 communes françaises propriétaires de forêts couvrant près de 2,5 millions d’hectares et produisant près de 20 millions de mètres cubes de bois par an. «Nous sommes heureux de pouvoir contribuer à cette émergence de la responsabilité organisée des élus locaux de l’ensemble des pays d’Afrique de l’ouest pour ce qui concerne les forêts», ajoute Monin. La commune de Mayahi, dans la région de Maradi au Niger, a déjà une petite expérience dans la gestion de la forêt communale et reconnaît que les avantages sont aujourd’hui évidents après les premières difficultés liées à la mobilisation des populations et à la définition des frontières des communes.

Selon Abdou Neino, maire de la commune urbaine de Mayahi qui a été la première à expérimenter cette gestion décentralisée des forêts au Niger, l’initiative a consisté à diviser les plantations de doums qui s’étendent sur 70 kilomètres entre les quatre communes, en collaboration avec les chefs traditionnels, l’administration et les élus locaux. «Chaque commune connaît les limites de son territoire, et depuis ce temps, avec la chefferie et l’administration, on a balisé pour séparer les aires cultivables et l’aire pastorale pour gérer les conflits. Pendant hivernage, l’éleveur connaît où se limiter... et celui qui entre dans le domaine de l’autre est arrêté», indique Neino, affirmant que les conflits sont devenus rares dans sa région. «La responsabilisation des communes est une bonne chose car les forestiers ne sont pas en nombre suffisant pour gérer les ressources forestières; or il faut une gestion rapprochée pour préserver les forêts», explique à IPS, Adama Doulkom, directeur des forêts du Burkina. Selon Doulkom, le code forestier et le code des collectivités du Burkina prévoient la création des forêts communales. Plus de 300 forêts communales, dont les superficies varient de 100 à 1.000 hectares, attendent d’être cédées aux collectivités lors de la mise en œuvre des textes de la décentralisation.

Après la rencontre de Ouagadougou, des sites pilotes ont été créés en Côte d’Ivoire, au Burkina et en Gambie, qui pourraient faire école pour les autres pays de la sous-région. La FNCOFOR, qui suscitera et appuiera les programmes forestiers des communes réunies en association dans le cadre de la coopération décentralisée, soutient déjà des programmes au Cameroun et au Bénin. Au Bénin, un programme d’appui aux forêts communales est en cours d’élaboration avec l’appui technique de l’Agence française de développement. Au Cameroun, un programme de 13 millions d’euros permettra la création de 50 forêts communales sur 1,2 million d’hectares dans les provinces de l’est (site de Bertoua), du centre et du sud (site de Yaoundé), et de l’ouest (site de Foumbam). (FIN/2009)

http://ipsinternational.org/fr/_note.asp?idnews=5398

Concours de photos Solidaires du monde / Planète Jeunes sur le thème de la solidarité

L'Agence Française de Développement et le magazine Planète Jeunes s’associent à l’occasion d’un concours de photos sur la thématique de la solidarité. A cette occasion, nous serions ravis que vous le relayiez autour de vous afin de faire participer de nombreux jeunes à ce concours.

Ce concours est ouvert à tous les jeunes de moins de 25 ans habitant dans les pays où est diffusé Planète Jeunes, à savoir : Bénin, Burkina Faso, Cameroun, Cap Vert, Congo Brazza, Côte d’Ivoire, Gabon, Guadeloupe, Ghana, Guinée, Guyane, Haïti, la Réunion, Madagascar, Mali Martinique, Mauritanie, Mayotte, Niger, Nouvelle Calédonie, République Centrafricaine, République Démocratique du Congo, Rwanda, Sénégal, Tchad et Togo.

La participation est limitée à une seule photo par personne, accompagnée d’une légende mentionnant le lieu, la date et le sujet. Les mineurs sont soumis à la responsabilité parentale ou d’un représentant légal.
3 possibilités pour envoyer sa photo :
par courrier à Planète Jeunes – « Grand Prix Solidaires du monde » - 92 137 Issy-les-Moulineaux Cedex, France.
par mail à grand-prix@planete-jeunes.org
par téléphone portable au 00 33 6 08 70 52 56 (prix d’un MMS international)
Il est possible de participer jusqu’au 25 août.

Les photos seront jugées selon différents critères : esthétique (netteté, lumière, prise de vue), thématique (pertinence et originalité) et légende. Les gagnants seront désignés dans 3 catégories : photo envoyée par téléphone portable, photo prise à partir d'un appareil photo et photo prise par un appareil photo numérique. Concernant cette dernière, le grand prix sera attribué par les internautes de la plate-forme www.solidairesdumonde.org parmi 20 photos sélectionnées par le jury. Les internautes pourront voter pour leurs photos préférées à partir du 31 juillet.

Rendez-vous début septembre pour connaître le nom des gagnants !

Les photos des trois gagnants seront publiées dans le numéro de décembre du magazine Planète Jeunes et en simultané sur la plate-forme de blogs Solidaires du monde.
Les auteurs des clichés gagnants se verront récompensés de nombreux lots dont un ordinateur portable, un iPhone 3G ou encore un appareil photo numérique.

Vous pouvez retrouver ici le règlement du concours dans son intégralité (la date de fin de participation au concours a été repoussée au 25 août).

Nous comptons sur vous pour en parler autour de vous !

L’équipe Solidaires du monde

Wednesday, 15 July 2009

UNCCD

UNCCD

G8 Summit on Desertification
The G8 Summit ended Friday, 10 July 2009. See what these governments declared concerning sustainable development, and desertification, land degradation and drought in particular, at: http://www.unccd.int/publicinfo/g8/menu.php

UNCCD News
The first issue of the UNCCD electronic newsletter, UNCCD New, was published last week. See the message from Executive Secretary Luc Gnacadja. Get a quick snap-shot of the Land Day's focus and engagement with climate change participants regarding the significance of the Desertification Convention in addressing climate change. Find out what the UNCCD’s first Scientific Conference will be offering. Read Ambassador Bo Kjellén’s candid view of the UNCCD. Kjellén was the Chair of the group that negotiated the Convention. Explore the technological innovations being used to address desertification and land degradation, and browse through the latest publications on DLDD. Visit: http://newsbox.unccd.int/

World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought From Internet social networks, to space observations, to village rallies and tree-planting activities, regional seminars and national conferences, the observance of the World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought was characterized by variety and innovation. Get inspired to share ideas of your unique event or to organize your 2010 observance events from the latest reports that are available at: http://www.unccd.int/publicinfo/june17/2009/menu.php?newch=l4

Saturday, 11 July 2009

AfricaAdapt launches new fund for innovative knowledge sharing

Africa’s poor and vulnerable communities rarely have the opportunity to share their valuable experience and learn from others in broader or more formal exchanges of knowledge on climate change adaptation. AfricaAdapt is launching its new Knowledge Sharing Innovation Fund promoting new ways of sharing knowledge that can help address this problem.

How does the Innovation Fund work?
The Knowledge Sharing Innovation Fund will offer grants of up to US$10.000 to projects that seek to overcome barriers to share knowledge with ’hard to reach’ or marginalised African communities. These barriers may be related to language, access to information and marginalisation due to gender or disability. Theatre performances, songs, radio broadcasts, visual arts, videos and comics are just a few ideas about how they could be overcome. The key is to ensure these groups can learn and share.

Why reach out to marginalised communities?
Ensuring that vulnerable communities are active in the exchange of African knowledge, best practices and know-how on climate change adaptation is a high priority for AfricaAdapt. These communities are the most directly threatened by climactic impacts, however they also have a wealth of experience in adapting to past changes that could benefit other communities.

Do you have an idea? Apply now!
African researchers, local and civil society organisations, cooperatives and community networks are encouraged to submit their ideas.

Important dates:
First round of submissions open from 1 July to 1 August 2009.
Shortlisted applicants will be notified by 15 October.

Fond d'Innovation AfricaAdapt maintenant disponible

Fond d'Innovation AfricaAdapt maintenant disponible

Formulaire de candidature au Fond d'Innovation AfricaAdapt maintenant disponible
blaneh Wednesday June 24 2009 Fond d'Innovation

Le Fond d’Innovation AfricaAdapt soutient jusqu’ à l'hauteur de 10.000 dollars US des initiatives originales de partage de connaissances pour valoriser le savoir des communautés locales en matière d'adaptation. Ces communanutés sont souvent à l'écart car elles souffrent des barriières de la langue, du manque d'accès à l'information, de la marginalisation des femmes ou encore des personnes handicapées.Les pièces de théâtre, chansons, émissions de radio, vidéos, sketches sont des initiatives qui permerttent d'engager la participation active des communautés dans le partage d’expériences.Les Manifestations d’intérêt doivent être envoyées entre le 1er Juillet et le 1er Août 2009. Les candidats pré-sélectionnés seront informés dès le 15 Août et devront soumettre un dossier complet à la date du 15 Septembre 2009.

http://www.africa-adapt.net/AA/NetworkNews.aspx

Adaptation Afrique : Nouvelles et activités ACCA

Adaptation Afrique : Nouvelles et activités ACCA

Contenu

1. Le point sur les projets
2. Couverture médiatique
3. Concours
4. Événements
5. Publications
6. Ressources relatives à l’adaptation aux changements climatiques


1. Le point sur les projets

Nouveau Fonds de Soutien aux Stratégies locales d’Adaptation
Un nouveau fonds a été mis sur pied pour aider les groupes vulnérables de trois pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest à proposer des recherches en adaptation pouvant répondre aux besoins de collectivités locales. Ce fonds est géré par IED Afrique avec le soutien financier du programme ACCA. Le premier appel a ciblé des organisations communautaires du Burkina Faso, du Mali et du Sénégal. Cliquez ici pour en savoir plus : http://www.idrc.ca/acca/ev-133599-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html

Projets récents du programme ACCA
Depuis l’appel à propositions du programme ACCA sur les vulnérabilités urbaines de septembre 2009, cinq nouveaux projets ont été approuvés. Tous les renseignements sur l’appel à propositions et les nouveaux projets sont disponibles en ligne au http://www.idrc.ca/fr/ev-131052-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html.

Autres projets récemment approuvés :

· Partenariat pour aider les populations vulnérables à faire face à la salinisation des sols attribuable aux changements climatiques au Sénégal mené par l’Institut sénégalais de recherches agricoles (ISRA)

· Trousse d’outils pour le suivi et l’évaluation des initiatives d’adaptation aux changements climatiques menée par la Commission économique des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique (CEA)

· Approche écosanté pour le contrôle de l’onchocercose dans la région Volta du Ghana menée par le Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research de l’Université du Ghana et Analyse des retombées sur la santé des stratégies d’adaptation aux changements climatiques : La transmission de la leishmaniose cutanée zoonotique à Leishmania major en Tunisie gérée par l’Agence tunisienne de coopération technique et mise en œuvre par l’Observatoire des maladies émergentes sont les derniers éléments de l’initiative ACCA-Ecosanté, L’eau, les changements climatiques et la santé.

· Permettre aux chercheurs africains d’accéder aux espaces politiques en matière d’adaptation (Kenya, Malawi et Ouganda), projet mené par l’Institut d’études pour le développement de l’Université de Sussex

2. Couverture médiatique

Vous trouverez les liens vers des articles parus dans les médias sur les événements et les projets de recherche du programme ACCA au :
http://www.idrc.ca/fr/ev-141450-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html


3. Concours

Réseau AfricaAdapt et Fonds d’innovation pour le partage des connaissances
Le réseau AfricaAdapt, une nouvelle plateforme d’échange sur l’adaptation aux changements climatiques en Afrique, a été inauguré en mai 2009. Du 1er juillet au 1er août 2009, l’équipe d’AfricaAdapt invite les organismes à soumettre des projets visant le partage des connaissances au sein des collectivités africaines marginalisées et difficiles d’accès, et ce, en offrant par l’intermédiaire du Fonds d’innovation des subventions pouvant aller jusqu’à 10 000 $ US par projet.
Pour avoir plus de renseignements sur le réseau AfricaAdapt ou le Fonds d’innovation pour le partage des connaissances, veuillez visiter le site www.africa-adapt.net.
Pour en savoir plus sur l’appui du programme ACCA au réseau AfricaAdapt : http://www.idrc.ca/fr/ev-140225-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html.

Objectifs
Le concours de photos Objectifs : protéger la planète permettra de recueillir des images documentant les moyens utilisés par les gens ordinaires du continent africain pour atténuer les conséquences des changements climatiques et de la dégradation de l’environnement. Le concours a été organisé par le PNUD, en collaboration avec l’Agence France-Presse (AFP) et Olympus Corporation. Les photos doivent être reçues au plus tard le 31 août 2009.
Pour de plus amples renseignements : http://picturethis.undp.org/fr.


4. Événements

Les villes et les changements climatiques
Les programmes ACCA et Pauvreté urbaine et environnement du CRDI collaborent pour appuyer le Symposium sur la recherche urbaine qui aura lieu à Marseille, en France, du 28 au 30 juin 2009. Les programmes ont permis d’offrir conjointement des rapports de recherche et des présentations sur le thème du symposium « Les villes et les changements climatiques : l’urgence d’agir ».

Session spéciale sur les changements climatiques dans le cadre de la CMAE
Evans Kituyi, administrateur du programme ACCA, a participé à titre d’observateur à la troisième session spéciale de la Conférence ministérielle africaine sur l’environnement (CMAE) qui portait sur les changements climatiques du 25 au 29 mai 2009. Les ministres africains de l’Environnement ont ainsi pu discuter d’une position commune pour les négociations sur le régime climatique post-2012 et d’un cadre de travail regroupant l’ensemble des divers programmes africains sur les changements climatiques.
Les détails de la session spéciale sont disponibles au http://www.unep.org/roa/Amcen/Amcen_Events/3rd_ss/default.asp.
Un exposé de politique pour la troisième session spéciale a été préparé par le programme ACCA et est accessible au http://www.idrc.ca/ev_fr.php?ID=142157_201&ID2=DO_TOPIC

Analyse de la vulnérabilité du Maroc à l’égard des changements climatiques
Les partenaires, le personnel et les conseillers du programme ACCA se sont rencontrés à Agadir en mai 2009 pour participer à une table ronde sur les façons dont la recherche-action participative permet d’aborder les enjeux en matière de vulnérabilité aux changements climatiques. Des chercheurs de quatre projets ont présenté leurs travaux réalisés après la septième réunion du Conseil consultatif du programme ACCA. Sir Gordon Conway, scientifique en chef du DFID, était présent pour souligner l’importance de faire participer les collectivités à la mise à l’essai des stratégies d’adaptation. M. Mohamed Badraoui, directeur général de l’INRA, a souligné la nécessité de protéger les réalisations du Maroc pour amortir les effets des changements climatiques.
Pour en apprendre davantage : http://www.idrc.ca/ev_fr.php?ID=142086_201&ID2=DO_TOPIC

Participation des conseillers à la conférence sur les changements climatiques et la mobilité humaine en Afrique
Le président et le vice-président du Conseil consultatif du programme ACCA ont participé à la conférence « Changements climatiques et mobilité humaine en Afrique » organisée par le Centro Studi di Politica Internazionale (CeSPI) et le ministère italien des Affaires étrangères à Rome les 21 et 22 avril 2009. Le vice-président Balgis Osman Elasha a présenté aux participants un aperçu du rapport du GIEC sur l’Afrique, alors que le président Mbareck Diop a souligné le travail du programme ACCA lors d’une table ronde sur les liens entre vulnérabilité environnementale, migration, paix et stabilité. Vous trouverez les documents et les renseignements sur la conférence au http://www.cespi.it/climate-dev-africa.html.

Améliorer le suivi et l’évaluation de la recherche sur l’adaptation aux changements climatiques
Le personnel et les partenaires du programme ACCA ont passé en revue différentes approches de suivi et d’évaluation de la recherche sur l’adaptation dans le cadre d’un atelier donné à Mombasa, au Kenya, en mai 2009. Les partenaires de recherche ont donné leur avis sur les besoins en matière de diffusion des résultats de recherche et ont pu se familiariser avec le réseau AfricaAdapt, une nouvelle plateforme de partage des connaissances mise en œuvre à l’échelle du continent. Pour de plus amples renseignements sur les ateliers de renforcement des capacités du programme ACCA, visitez le http://www.idrc.ca/fr/ev-126891-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html.

Améliorer les communications avec les décideurs
Le programme ACCA a financé un symposium d’une demi-journée sur la diffusion efficace des données sur la science et les changements climatiques aux décideurs. L’événement a eu lieu dans le cadre de la 3e conférence est-africaine sur la science et la santé) tenue à Nairobi du 25 au 27 mars 2009. Elle a permis de réunir des journalistes, des chercheurs et des décideurs qui ont ciblé des lacunes en matière de capacité et des possibilités pour améliorer les communications sur les enjeux en matière de science et de changements climatiques dans la sous-région.
Consultez le rapport complet au http://www.idrc.ca/ev_fr.php?ID=141838_201&ID2=DO_TOPIC.


5. Publications

· L’article “Farmers' perceptions lead to experimentation and learning”de P. Mapfuo et coll., publié dans le périodique LEISA Magazine, vol. 24 (numéro spécial sur les changements climatiques), fait état des premiers résultats du projet du programme ACCA « La résilience et les petits exploitants agricoles africains ».

· L’article « Accompagner des citoyens dans des actions d’adaptation aux changements climatiques », de Diane Pruneau, Abdellatif Khattabi et Jackie Kerry, est publié aux pages 48 à 52 du document Énergie, santé et éducation relatives à l’environnement de l’IEPF. M. Khattabi est responsable du projet du programme ACCA « Gestion des côtes marocaines : renforcer les capacités afin de s’adapter aux changements climatiques au moyen de politiques et d’une planification viables ».

· Un article sur la malaria et les changements climatiques écrit par Andrew Githeko est publié dans le Commonwealth Health Ministers’ Update 2009. Le chercheur Githeko est responsable du projet du programme ACCA « Transfert du modèle prédictif d’épidémie de paludisme aux utilisateurs de l’Afrique de l’Est ».


6. Ressources relatives à l’adaptation aux changements climatiques

L’Overseas Development Institute et la Fondation Heinrich Böll ont créé un nouveau site Web indépendant permettant de repérer les initiatives de financement internationales adoptées pour aider les pays en développement à aborder les défis que présentent les changements climatiques. Visitez le www.climatefundsupdate.org.
Diffusion des résultats de recherche
Nouveauté ! Le programme ACCA offre une compilation de ressources en ligne pour faciliter la diffusion des résultats de recherche de ses partenaires : http://www.idrc.ca/fr/ev-141591-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html.

Études exploratoires sur les capacités d’adaptation en Afrique
En 2007, le programme ACCA a fait appel à des experts en adaptation aux changements climatiques pour mener une série d’études exploratoires afin d’analyser les forces et les besoins en matière de capacité des institutions africaines. Vous pouvez consulter les rapports régionaux au
http://www.idrc.ca/fr/ev-142225-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html


Le programme Adaptation aux changements climatiques en Afrique par la recherche et le renforcement des capacités (ACCA) vise à renforcer la capacité des populations et organisations africaines à s'adapter aux changements climatiques de façon bénéfique pour les plus vulnérables. Le programme, lancé en 2006, est conjointement financé par le Centre de recherches pour le développement international (CRDI) du Canada et le Department for International Development (DFID) du Royaume-Uni. Il est logé au CRDI qui en assure la gestion à partir de son siège à Ottawa et des trois bureaux régionaux en Afrique.

www.crdi.ca/acca

READ MORE RECENT NEWS AND OPINIONS

WASH news Africa

Jobs4Development.com Customised Jobs Feed

Eldis Climate Change

Eldis Climate Adaptation

Eldis Environment

CEPF Top Stories

Water Supply and Sanitation News

FAO/Forestry/headlines

InforMEA

GBIF News

CBD News Headlines

Sustainable Development Policy & Practice - Daily RSS Feed

IISD Linkages

IISD - Latest Additions

Climate Change Headlines

WWF - Environmental News

DESERTIFICATION

IUCN - News

IRIN - Water & Sanitation